Recipe Swap

Ok so this has been suggested, seconded, thirded and awaited (at least by my self) so here it is- The Cooking Thread ^-^ I figured we could share recipes- both ones we've created, and ones we've found- comment share, and other wise discuss the joys of culinary arts (what can I say? I was a hop skip and a jump away from going to culinary school ^-^) Anyhoo here it is. Enjoy.

Forums: 
raecchi's picture

Devotee

I'd offered to start this thread, hadn't I? The weekend got the better of me, I suspect. I'll fork over the recipe that is basically my current consort. (I've made it four or five times in the past couple weeks!)

White Cake

3 C. flour
1 1/2 C. white sugar
1/2 TBS baking soda
3/4 tsp. salt
1 1/2 C. water
1/3 C. veggie oil
1/2 TBS apple cider vinegar
1 tsp vanilla

Mix and bake in greased 9x13 or bundt cake pan at 350 degrees for roughly 30 minutes.

This recipe is great on so many levels. You can feed it to vegans and vegetarians alike, you can make it even when you're out of eggs, and it's incredibly versatile! The cup and a half of water can be subbed with all kinds of things. I've done peach Snapple and mixed chopped peaches into the batter, or coconut milk (takes about a 14 oz can, since it's thicker) and glazed the cake with dark chocolate. I even made the cake straight and added strawberries and marshmallows. (The recipe would also be enough for a batch of cake balls, if you wanted to do 'em entirely from scratch!)

I'm not, shockingly, making this today. Instead I'm doing an egg-free chocolate chip cookie dough, which will be frozen and dipped in chocolate coating. And maybe, maybe some bread to go with dinner, if I get ambitious.

Happy baking!

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

This recipe sounds delectable. I really want to try adding coconut milk like you said, and then putting maybe drizzling with sweetened condensed milk and putting some shredded coconut and then a little chocolate drizzle. My boyfriend is a coconut fiend. Which reminds me, my best recipe- his favorite, and the one that makes my family froth at the mouth, and the one that my mom is insisting that I come home on her birthday to make: Coconut Chicken Curry.

I got a recipe for it online once and have since tweaked it a bit, so this is partially my own. I'm estimating the measurements, and you can add more or less of anything you want to taste, it's can handle it. Serving size- my family, 6 people- make smaller as necessary by adding less of everything. (dur)

Ingredients:
3 lbs boneless chicken, cut into stir-fry size pieces. I prefer using boneless thighs when I can find them, but breast is great too.
3 tbsp lime juice
2+ tbsp yellow curry powder
2+ tsp ginger
A little vegetable oil to fry in
1 very large onion or two or three small ones, chopped
Other vegetables- I've used peppers, eggplant, and broccoli
1 can of coconut cream (or milk, but cream is much richer)
3/4 cup raisins
1 cup sweetened shredded coconut
salt and pepper to taste

Coat chicken in the spices and lime juice and allow to sit for at least 15 minutes. You can do this while you are chopping the other veggies.
Sautee the onion in the vegetable oil. Add the chicken and fry until fully cooked, drain a little liquid off. Add vegetables and sautee just a little, then add coconut milk, raisins, half the sweetened shredded coconut. Simmer on medium until raisins are juicy and everything is cooked, and serve over rice with a sprinkle of shredded coconut on top.
Again, you can add more or less of anything you want. Also, my secret troubleshoot for when it isn't creamy enough and I don't want to open another can of coconut cream- adding a little bit of sour cream.

Hope you guys like it!

MsGamgee's picture

Embodiment

I'm actually the vice president of the culinary club at my school, so I've got quite the plethora to choose from! Do we want savory or sweet to start? Smile

raecchi's picture

Devotee

Savory, please! I'm pretty good at baking, but it's almost all sweets -- I don't cook nearly as often as I bake! Anything exciting to do with veggies would be great, too.

(Also, wow, vice pres of a culinary club is pretty awesome!)

MsGamgee's picture

Embodiment

Let's start with an old favorite; my own take on a country-cookin' classic that I only make occasionally because it warms the heart with its artery-clogging abilities.

(Sort of) Country-Fried Chicken with White Gravy

This is an imprecise science, I'm warning you in advance. My ingredients are usually somewhere in the range of:

*a package of boneless chicken breasts; usually three or four breasts. (this is starting out well, after all the ball talk in the other thread!)
*about a cup of flour
*half a cup of breadcrumbs
*one egg
*two tablespoons-ish of milk or water
*cooking oil for the pan
*between half a cup and a cup of milk for the gravy
*salt
*pepper
*garlic powder (optional)

Heat cooking oil in a skillet on the stove over medium-high heat.

Take the breasts and, putting between layers of plastic wrap (or in a plastic bag,) pound flat. They make mallets for this purpose, but if you haven't one pretty much any large, relatively heavy blunt object will do. This serves to tenderize the meat and make it go further.

Whisk together the egg and tablespoons of milk or water in a medium bowl. Dunk the chicken in this mixture.

Mix the flour and breadcrumbs in a large, shallow bowl or large dinner plate; straight flour, I find, doesn't have enough of a texture to it, and straight breadcrumbs takes you into the realm of Italian food; the 2-to-1 ratio seems to be a good compromise. Season the mixture with the salt, pepper and garlic powder. Dip the eggy chicken in this, coating liberally and making sure all surface is covered while patting off any extra back into the bowl.

Pan-fry the chicken until golden brown; it's okay if you get impatient and flip early, just let it cook for a while and flip back. This doesn't seem to make the chicken too greasy. It is important, however, that the pan/oil be hot when you put the chicken in, or else the chicken sits in the grease, soaking up fat and not cooking for the first few minutes. Drain the cooked chicken on a paper towel and set aside. You can keep it warm in a low-heat oven if you desire.

Reserve about a tablespoon of the pan drippings, and pour out the rest. Put the pan back on the stove, around medium low heat, and add one to two tablespoons of the flour mixture that you dunked the chicken in. Whisk this in the pan with the drippings until the flour clumps up. At this point, add a small quantity of your milk. It should sizzle and bubble as it mixes with the flour; if not, your heat isn't quite high enough. Whisk the milk and flour gently until sauce thickens and possibly clumps; add more milk as necessary. Once a thick-but-pourable consistency is reached, season with salt and pepper and serve with the chicken, usually poured over top.

This is really a simple recipe; you're just breading and pan-frying the chicken, then making a very thick roux for sauce. It's easy, delicious, filling, and cheap. Not the healthiest thing you'll ever eat, but less bad for you than the traditionally deep fried country-fried chicken. I hope you enjoy!

Ladyinahat's picture

I have so many that everyone in my family has a different one. But I did come up with an unussual meatloaf recipe that is really good.

2 lb cheap hamburger
2 lb gound venision
3 C crushed Trisciuts with garlic and rosemary olive oil
1 large onion diced
5 eggs
2 20 oz speggetti sauce
garlic powder
pepper
salt

Put in large mixing bowl meats, triscuits, eggs and one can of sauce. Season with garlic pepper and salt to desired smell. Mix well by hand until well mixed. May need to add more crumbs to get desired consistency.
Line roasting pan with tin foil. take half of meat mixture and form into loaf and put it in pan. Then take other half and do the same in that pan. Take the last can of sauce and cover both loaves comepletely.
Put into oven at 350 degrees F. for 2.5 hours.
It is very tender and juicey. Enjoy!

FYI: when cooking with venision it is very dry that is why I siad cheap hamburger because the fat content is ussually higher and will be just enough to make it very tender with out a lot of grease in the bottom of your pan.

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

That brings me back. I love the sound of this recipe, and am definitely going to try it, maybe with some turkey instead of venison though. I've never thought of Triscuits in it!

Ladyinahat's picture

type of ground meat you want to in to this recipe for meatloaf. I have used turkey, chicken, pork, buffalo, and elk as well as the venision. The only thing you have to watch is to make sure if you are using pork that you get pretty good hamburger. other wise you end up with a greasey mess.

And yes I know I cook with a very wide varitey of things. But it is all good eatin'!!

faile486's picture

Petitioner

Spaghetti
-----------

1 C Chopped Onion
1 1/2 LB Ground Chuck, Browned
2 Cloves Garlic
1 Large Can Hunt's Whole Tomatoes
1 8oz Can Tomato Sauce
2 Tsp Salt
3 Tsp Dried Oregano
1/2 Tsp Dried Thyme
1 Bay Leaf

Brown and Drain the ground beef. Combine all ingredients in Crock-Pot, stir. Cover and cook on low for 10-12 hours, or high 3-5 hours.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
My mother used to double this recipe for a family of 5, and we rarely had leftover sauce. It was everyone's favorite meal.

sherinik's picture

Postulant

How about a quiche? I make this one with zucchini, although I've tried other vegetables too, you just need to play around with the liquid a bit. Carrot for example is much dried than zucchini!

This is possibly even nicer cold than hot - perfect picnic food or school lunches.

2 cups shredded zucchini
1/2 cup shredded onion
1 cup selfraising flour
1 cup grated cheese (I've used tasty or mozzarella/tasty mix)
1/4 cup olive oil
5 700gm eggs (or 4 duck eggs)
a handful of bacon pieces
Salt and pepper to taste

In a fairly large bowl, mix vegetables, cheese and bacon together, make a well in the middle, crack in the eggs and slop in the oil, mix liquids together then incorporate into the dry ingredients, season to taste and tip into an oiled baking dish. Bake at 180°C for 45 minutes.

My secret ingredient - lemon pepper seasoning instead of salt & pepper. I love the extra zing!

V's picture

Embodiment

Long time family favorite, although I found several nearly identical recipes online with a quick search.

Creme de Menthe Brownies

Cake Layer
4 eggs, beaten
1 cup sugar
1 can (16 oz) chocolate syrup
1/2 cup soft margarine or butter
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt - optional
Mix well and put into a greased 9x13" pan. Bake at 350 F for 25-30 minutes. Cool.

Mint Layer
2 cup 10x (confectioners) sugar
1/2 cup soft margarine or butter
2 tablespoons green creme de menthe syrup
Mix and spread on cool cake.

Chocolate Glaze
6 oz (1 cup) semi-sweet chocolate chips
6 tablespoons butter
Melt butter and chocolate chips together (microwave on half power works well). Chill a little (a few minutes in the refrigerator) and spread on top of the mint layer. Chill 15-30 minutes. Cut into squares.

Tips--chilling the cake/mint layer makes it easier to spread the glaze, and storing leftovers in the fridge works well, too.

magalicious's picture

Postulant

This is pure evil. I love you for it, but evil.
I *do* have creme de menthe in the kitchen ...

V's picture

Embodiment

then I can tell you haven't tried it yet }:)

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

(1) 16 oz package of coleslaw mix
(3) packages of Ramen Noodles
1 cup of sunflower seeds
½ cup of almonds
Green onions chopped fine (if desired) for color and taste

Mix all of the above ingredients.

Dressing:
Use the packets of seasoning from the noodles (2-3)
1/3 cup rice wine vinegar
¾ cup of sugar
¾ cup of olive oil
Ginger Sesame dressing
2 tbs. of soy sauce

You can make the dressing ahead of time (the night before if you wish).

Do not pour the dressing on the salad until right before you serve it as the salad will get “soggy”.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

1 package Bob's Red Mill cornbread mix
um, everything you need for the mix--I think it's an egg, some oil and water, though I usually use buttermilk instead of water

Enough very juicy cooked beans to thickly cover the bottom of a 9x13 pan

This is what I do with the last of a big crockpot of homemade ham beans, but it'd work with vegetarian beans, too. Preheat your oven to 350F. Butter or no-stick spray your 9x13 pan. Spread the beans on the bottom of the pan. In a separate bowl, mix up the cornbread to the package directions (here's where you can substitute your own cornbread recipe or a box of Jiffy or whatever if you can tolerate gluten). Spread the cornbread batter over the beans. Don't worry if you don't reach the edges all around. Pop it in the oven and bake till the cornbread is done. Eat piping hot.

On the off chance there is any left, put it in pieces in a casserole and cover with shredded cheese; bake or microwave until heated through and the cheese is bubbly.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

This started filling up pretty quick.
raecchi- its ok about not starting it. Weekends happen, life goes on and in teh end food is shared by all ^-^

And now for my first contribution
Peanut Butter Honey Chicken Wrap
Whatcha need
-1 not-too-big chicken breast (I use the thin-sliced Nature's Basket Chicken from Giant Eagle- one of those should work- there are around 3 or so in a pound I think)
-peanut butter (I use creamy but feel free to try it with the crunchy)
-Honey
-toasted sesame oil (this stuff has a rather. . . unique flavor to it so I suggest going easy on it until you how much you like it)
-a few fresh chives (again I use Giant Eagle's)
-McCormick's 'Far East Sesame Ginger Blend"
-bit o' butter
-tortilla (I use Giant Eagle brand 8" wheat tortillas)

Whatcha do
In a lightly buttered skillet over medium-high heat cook the chicken until no longer pink. Once cooked through, remove the chicken from the skillet and cut into strips. Return to pan and add a bit of honey ( I can't really say how much but I think its less than a tablespoon) and add a dash or the Far East Blend. Cook until the honey starts to turn the chicken a light golden brown. Sample a small piece to check flavor and add more honey or seasoning to taste.
In the mean time, chop the chives into small bits adn prepare the peanut buteer sesame sauce- see bottom of recipe portion of post.
Spread the peanut butter sesame sauce over one side of the tortilla, leave about 1" around the edge. Add chicken in a rectangular shape (Don't really know how to describe this one other than to say make sure the chicken stays near the center and is arranged so there is a bit more tortilla to work with to the top and bottom of the chicken than to the sides. Hope thats clear and not too confusing) near the center of the tortilla. Add chives. Fold the two small sides of the tortilla in then roll from the bottom up to create a wrap/burrito. Place the wrap, seam side down in a lightly greased skillet and cook until that side is golden brown then flip it over and repeat with the other side.

Peanut Butter Sesame Sauce:
Put 1-2 heaping tablespoons of peanut butter into a microwave safe mug (I just use a standard cereal spoon). Add a 1-3 dashes of the toasted sesame oil. Microwave for 42 seconds (Yes I believe the number 43 is the answer to Life the Universe and Everything ^-^). Stir until smooth and taste. Adjust the sauce to taste by adding a bit more peanut butter or sesame oil.

Okay- a few notes on this one. One, I've only made it a couple time but found it to be quite enjoyable. Two- One thing I would like to try adding to it sometime would be sauteed red onions (why? because I had a really yummy wrap type deal at the Mediterranean place in town and it had red onions in it and I though that they might work in this too.)
Feel free to let me know what you think of this and any variations/add-ins/suggestions you might have for it. I hope it wasn't too confusing. Enjoy ^-^

Davik's picture

Embodiment

So I have far too many recipes to give out here (25+ written up, plus probably a hundred or more I've never bothered to type up, and then there's the Korean that I'm just learning...). Like paisleigh I was very close to going to culinary school, so I have lots to share and I love to give them out, but I'm only going to post a couple of them to start. If people want me to post more I'll keep going until I've run out of what I have typed up (and maybe type up a few of my other favorites that I've never spent the time to write up).
So the first two:
Basil and pepper chicken alfredo, my signature award winning dish:
The recipe itself is a fettucini alfredo with basil and
cracked pepper chicken. You'll have to forgive the fact that I
don't have exact proportions on this so I'm just kind of
estimating; taste it as you go and decide how much you want to
put in.

For the alfredo sauce:
1/4 cup butter
1 cup heavy cream
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese

For the chicken:
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 package Fresh basil (usually ends up being several handful
of leaves)
1/2 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp rosemary
1-2 tbsp black pepper
olive oil
garlic 2-3 cloves
salt to taste

Start by cleaning the basil and carefully cutting the tops
with the flowers off, you'll need to save two of these as
garnish for the dish (I think it's a little better than the
customary parsley sprig). Slice the rest of the basil into
strips; set aside a small handful of the sliced basil to go
into the alfredo sauce, the rest will be cooked with the
chicken. Mince the garlic cloves. Using a spoon or a mortar
and pestle coarsely crack the black pepper (can use a pepper
mill, but it'll take a long time to grind that much pepper and
most pepper mills will grind it too finely). If you have a
mortar and pestle grind the rosemary, if not just crack it up
by hand.

In a large deep skillet heat the olive oil at a little more
than medium heat, saute the garlic until it is beginning to
turn a light golden; add the chicken. As the chicken is
cooking add the basil and pepper slowly, allowing the the
basil added before to cook down some before adding the next.
Completely cook the chicken and remove from heat.

In a small pot melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium
low heat. Add cream and simmer for 5 minutes, then add garlic
and cheese and whisk quickly, heating through. The sauce will
look fairly thin at this point but will thicken as it cools.
Pour the sauce into the skillet with the chicken and add the
fresh basil, heat on low.

Cook the fettucini noodles according to instructions, strain
and add a small amount of olive oil to keep them from
sticking. Place fettucini on a plate and top with alfredo and
chicken, garnish with the basil flower.

To really make this impressive a few things should go with it;
get a good loaf of french bread and warm it, baked brie is an
excellent accompaniment to the french bread. A simple salad
with a light basil and rosemary vinaigrette is a nice starter,
and definitely get a bottle of wine for with the meal (and
probably another for after). For the wine I would suggest a
flavorful red, but not one that is too dry (a merlot will
typically work well ), and get a good bottle (spend more than
$15 a bottle unless you really know your wine, I would suggest
a merlot from benziger wineries, they tend to be less dry
wines with a good flavor, run about $18 a bottle, though it's
a hard winery to find).
Katsudon, Japanese breaded pork cutlet in a sweet sauce:
As always, amounts are approximate.
7 T soy sauce
6 T sugar
sprinkling of dashi (japanese bullion base similar to bonito flakes)
5 T mirin (sweet japanese rice wine)
2 T sake
lean pork (typically two pork chops, adjust the amount of sauce appropriately for other amounts)
egg
panko (japanese breadcrumbs)

Slice pork thinly (1/4 inch maximum) and trim of fat, dip in egg and then panko. Fry in vegtable oil until golden brown and completely cooked. Slice cooked pork in to 1 cm wide strips.

Take two cup measuring cup, add one cup hot water, add first 5 ingredients.

Divide pork in to 3 portions. Put 2/3 C of the sauce in a wok, over moderately high heat add a portion of pork and bring to a boil; when boiling crack an egg into the mix and stir rapidly with cooking chopsticks or a fork until the egg is cooked. Remove batch from the wok and repeat for remaining batches.

raecchi's picture

Devotee

Yes! Yes! This is one of my favorite things to have at a tiny local Japanese restaurant. They serve it over rice and onions in one of the bowls with lids -- they crack the egg over the hot food and leave the cover on so it cooks. I've been wanting to make it for a while now. Thank you!

Don't suppose you have an agedashi tofu recipe lying around too? (My other fav.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I don't have one off the top of my head, but with 3 or 4 cookbooks on japanese food and a fair amount of experience if I come up with a good one I'll post it. I know I love tofu, even if it is horrendously misunderstood here (ma po tofu is one of my favorite chinese dishes to make).

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

I learned so much Japanese cooking from my host mothers in Japan, but all my cookbooks with their neatly scribbled recipes are at home. Sad So I'll leave agedashi tofu to you, Davik. Welcome, very happy you made an account!

By the way, I'm a third for almost going to a culinary school. Blum 3

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Since there's been a request:
1 Block firm tofu (11 oz)
potato or corn starch
1 seeded and minced dried chile
1 Minced green onion (green part only)

Sauce:
4-5 t mirin
1 C water with dashi
2-3 T light soy sauce
2-3 t soy sauce
2-3 t sugar

Drain the tofu (put some weight on the top and let it sit for half an hour or so). Cut the tofu into 8 pieces, wipe them dry with a paper towel, and dredge with the starch; let sit for a few minutes. Heat oil in a skillet or deep fryer to 340, and fry the tofu a couple pieces at a time until golden brown (don't put in more than two or three or you'll drop the temperature of the oil too much). Set the fried tofu aside. In another pot, combine the sauce ingredients with the minced chile and bring to a boil. Combine the sauce with the tofu, sprinkle with green onion; a side of daikon goes well with it.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

:jawdrop: Its the closest I could get to a "my mouth is watering" face. Literally it is. I /love/ chicken alfredo and would love to try this. Plus, with the pork recipe, my default meat is chicken (a close second is the "Smart Salmon" things at Giant Eagle) and I would love to find a few other things to try so this is defiantly on my "To Try" List. Now- to call my Gramma and see if I can make her dinner and desert. . . .^-^

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Someone else who does a lot of cooking for family huh? I know between my parents not being good cooks and me really enjoying cooking I tend to spend a lot of time cooking for them (not to mention that I'm poor, so playing personal chef for a week is one of the best presents I can come up with). Over xmas they cried uncle 8 courses into my 11 course day of spanish cuisine Smile

PS: I don't do a lot of dessert cooking because I'm not a giant fan of sweets, but I do have a few if you're interested: creme brule, panna cotta, cheese cake, baklava, and black forest cherry cake. Outside of that if anyone has any dessert recipes to share I'd love to add to my collection.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

. . . baklava?

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Well, this is really general, and may show just how much of an insomniac I am (damn, almost 5 AM), so feel free to play around with things:

2/3 to a pound of nuts, roughly equal amounts of almonds, walnuts, and pistachios (make sure all are toasted, and if the nuts are unsalted add a healthy pinch of salt to the mix). Grind these to a fine chop with about a 1/5th of a cup of sugar, 1 t cinnamon, and a dash of both ground clove and cardamom.

For the rest, add together a cup of honey, a cup of sugar, a half cup of water, a couple of cinnamon sticks, a couple of cloves, and a heavy pinch of ground cardamom. Boil this mixture until syrupy, keeping it mind that it will thicken as it cools.

Preheat your oven to 350, while putting 8 layers of phyllo down, brushing each with melted butter (you can do this with your fingers, but after buying a pastry brush for this, it's honestly a hell of a lot easier with the brush). Add half the nut mixture. Put down another 8 layers of phyllo brushed with butter. Add the rest of the nuts. Top with another 8 layers of buttered phyllo. Cut the top of the pastry into appropriately sized diamonds, sticking a clove in the center of each diamond as a garnish (note, clove should be removed on eating, and is optional). Bake until golden brown, remove from oven, cut all the way through, pour on the syrup, then let chill for at least 3 hours. Sprinkling the top of the phyllo with a little water before cooking will help prevent curling of the pastry.

PS: keep in mind that this is for a fairly small pan (maybe 8 by 8 inches at most; I'm used to working with my circular cake pans), so adjust as necessary for ingredients. Also, this is rich enough that a small pan will feed a small army Blum 3

PPS: As you may be able to tell from my general amounts, most of my recipes aren't meant to be for beginners. These are general ideas for people who already know how to taste and adjust once they have the basic principle. If you're like my mom, and cook by following the recipe to the letter you may or may not end up with something really good. And if you want to know about true cooking distasters, start a thread and I'll post both of my infamous curry mishaps Smile

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

I am going to make this this weekend. Yay!

magalicious's picture

Postulant

Is my friend. Wink
I make a sauce very similar to your alfredo but start out with a rue - it ends up being more gravy-like in consistency. Also, there is absolutely nothing better before a good meal than baked brie and a glass of red wine! I might post my recipe for brie baked en crute with chutney ...

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Ooo, please do, I keep alternating between the typical smearing a little dijon mustard on the brie before wrapping and smearing a little reduction of blackberry balsamic.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

There's a recipe module for Drupal. You guys want I should install it? It is the work of a moment.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I fell on my keyboard and installed the recipe module. Add recipes here.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

So I don't know if I'm tech challenged due to lack of sleep, or if it just hasn't been fully set up, but I'm getting an unauthorized when I go to put up recipes from that link. Any thoughts?

MeiLin's picture

Most High

Give me 30 seconds after this post, and it will be...

Davik's picture

Embodiment

So seeing the format of that, it's going to take me an eon or two to put my recipes up where I have to specify each ingredient and the amount (and I don't measure when I cook, especially when doing experimental cooking). So yeah, I'll either post my recipes here where I can just paste text files, or if there's any way for people to send messages asking me for my collection so I don't have to put up my email address...

MeiLin's picture

Most High

without amounts. Or you can just put them up here. Smile Whatever works for you.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

That works pretty slick. Seems to be a limited number of ingrediants though. And there's even a link at the top of the site. Beautimus.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

There's a button to add more ingredients. Or hit "preview" and you'll get more slots automatically.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Looks like it creates a new forum topic too.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Hell, I'll post a few more now, feel free to modify or distribute; recipes should be open source (though I wouldn't mind credit if you're going to start passing them out).

Stove top pulled pork BBQ:
Again, all amounts are approximate, taste as you go.

pork (two to three inch thick pork chops, trimmed of fat, roughly 2 lbs)
2 onions (minced or quartered, depending on preference)
4-5 cloves garlic (minced)
1/2 c vinegar (adjust to taste)
2.5-3 capfuls liquid smoke
2 handfuls sugar
1 T salt
1 t paprika
1-2 t rosemary
1-2 t black pepper (ground)
2 bayleaves
cayenne

saute onions and garlic, add water to fill pot and other ingredients, boil until almost dry; remove from heat. Shred meat and put back in pot.

Sauce:
little water
3 cloves garlic
1 t rosemary
1/2 t black pepper
1/4 c vinegar (adjust to taste)
handful dark brown sugar
1 T lemon juice
1/3 small can tomato paste
splash balsamic vinegar

Boil separately from the meat until syrupy and mixed. Add sauce to shredded meat and heat on low for a couple of minutes while stirring to mix flavors.

Qendrix's picture

I love to cook so much! Here's one of my favorite dessert recipes that's so good the girls ate work demand that I bring it before every Christmas.

You will need:
1 fairly large cookie sheet
Parchment paper
1 sleeve of Saltine crackers
1 stick of butter
1 cup of dark brown sugar
2 cups of chocolate chips
1 cup of chopped pecans (optional)

1) Preheat the oven to 400 degrees
2) Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and place crackers on top (side by side, forming a rectangle)
3) In a saucepan combine the butter and the sugar, then over medium heat boil the mixture for 5 minutes.
4) Pour the mixture over the saltines and spread with a metal spoon if needed.
5) Place cookie sheet in the oven for 6 minutes
6) Remove the pan from the oven and pour chocolate chips over the crackers and then spread the chocolate as the chips melt so that the entire surface is covered.
7) Sprinkle pecans over the chocolate.
8) Let it cool completely in the fridge for several hours and then break into pieces.

faile486's picture

Petitioner

1 cup butter
6 ounces unsweetened chocolate
8 ounces semi-sweet chocolate
2 cups sugar
4 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon almond extract
1/2 cup flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Preheat the oven to 325 F. Line a 9x13x2-inch cake pan with aluminum foil. Cover the foil with a light coat of butter. Fill a saucepan half full with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Combine the butter and chocolate in a medium stainless steel bowl and place over the saucepan. Reduce the heat to low. Stir the butter mixture until smooth, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool 5 minutes. Add the sugar and mix well. Add the eggs one at a time, beating to incorporate after each addition. Add the vanilla and almond extract. Combine the flour, cinnamon and salt in a small bowl. Add to the chocolate mixture and stir to thoroughly combine. Pour into prepared cake pan. Bake until the top is dry but the center is still moist, about 25 minutes. Be careful not to overbake. Remove from the oven and let cool.
-------------------------------------------

The cooking time in this recipe is inaccurate, but I've only made them a couple times and haven't gotten an accurate time yet. Your best bet is to start testing it at 20 minutes with a toothpick, and continue testing it every 5-10 minutes.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I'm bored, I'm watching Top Chef, and I want to bump this thread back up so that maybe people will either give me more recipes to play with or give me some feedback/variations on mine, so I'm going to post more recipes.

A smokey chili with a hint of sweetness and plenty of fire. As always, amounts are approximate. Be careful as it's careful to make this recipe pretty fiery.

1 lb ground beef
large can of black beans
1-2 cans of red kidney beans (rinsed)
~2 t liquid smoke
2-3 T sugar
1-2 onions, chopped
5-6 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
2-3 T cumin
1/2 t oregano
2 T dried ground new mexico chiles
small can of tomato paste
2 bay leaves
7 oz can of chipotles, chopped (use a 14 oz can if you can take the heat)
jalapenos to desired heat (serranos for a real kick), chopped
salt and pepper to taste

Saute the onion and garlic in a large pot with a little olive oil. When translucent add the jalapenos, cook for another couple of minutes before adding the ground beef and browning. When the beef is cooked add all other ingredients except the tomato paste with enough water to cover. Simmer for an hour or two to blend the flavors and achieve the desired amount of liquid. Add the tomato paste and cook until the paste is dissolved and the chili has thickened.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Time for another dessert; even my sister who doesn't like apple cobbler wanted this recipe. This one is even more amazing made in a dutch oven over a camp fire.

Apple cobbler with cinnamon and vanilla, along with crispy batter topping.
topping.

INGREDIENTS:

Apple Filling:
5 cups tart apples (think granny smith), peeled, sliced
3/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon butter, softened
Topping:
1/2 cup flour, sifted
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter, softened
1 egg, slightly beaten

PREPARATION:

In a medium bowl, combine apples, 3/4 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons flour,
cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon salt, vanilla and water. Turn into a lightly
buttered 9-inch square pan. Dot apples with 1 tablespoon butter.

Combine all topping ingredients.

Beat with wooden spoon until batter is smooth. Drop batter in 9
portions, over the apples, spacing evenly. Batter will spread during
baking. Bake 35 to 40 minutes at 375° or until apples are tender and
crust is golden brown. Serve warm with cream or ice cream.
Serves 6 to 8.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

that sounds GOOD. I think I may have to try it sometime soon.

I like baking, I swear I'm gonna make my family fat because I like making cookies so much.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Beef and black bean burritos, equally good when made with venison, though you typically need to add a little fat due to how lean venison is.

Ingredients:
2 lb beef (typically round steak or another tough cheap cut), trimmed of fat and cut in to 2" cubes
1-2 medium onions rough minced
4-5 cloves garlic minced
3-4 t cumin
2 t salt
black pepper
1/2 14 oz can (or one full 7 oz) chipotles (chopped)
2-3 t ground dried new mexico chiles
2 bay leaves
1/2 t oregano
splash white vinegar
veggie oil
1 can chopped green chiles
1 can diced tomatoes
several healthy dashes liquid smoke
jalepenos or serranos to taste (minced)
1 large can black beans

Saute the onions and garlic in the oil in a moderately sized chef's pan (generally about 4 quarts), adding the jalepenos after about a minute. When translucent, add the beef, enough water to mostly fill the pot, and all ingredients except the tomatoes, chopped green chiles, and black beans. Simmer for hours until liquid is mostly reduced (maybe 3/4" left in the pan) and the beef is tender. Scoop the beef out leaving the liquid and veggies as much as possible. Shred the beef using two forks. Return the beef to the remaining liquid along with the beans and tomatoes; cook until enough liquid is gone for it to make a decent burrito filling, stirring frequently. The beef will absorb a fair amount of liquid, but the tomatoes will release a lot while they cook.
Serve on tortillas with slices of montery jack cheese and either salsa verde or red enchilada sauce (recipes follow).
Keep in mind I don't measure ingredients, so all amounts are approximate, adjust to taste and heat tolerance.

Red Enchilada Sauce
Makes a great burrito/taco sauce, and is great spooned on to tortilla chips with lots of cheese and baked to make nachos. All ingredient amounts are approximate as I don't measure when I cook.

Large can crushed tomatoes
2 medium or 1 large onion, finely chopped
4-6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
Can of chipotles (7 oz for mild, 14 oz for hotter), chopped, with sauce reserved
bay leaf
2 capfuls liquid smoke
1-2 T cumin
2 T dried ground new mexico chiles
pinch of oregano
salt
pepper
small handful sugar
splash of olive oil
cayenne if greater heat is desired

Saute the onion and garlic, add everything else, with sufficient water to cover. Simmer for 1-2 hours, adding water when it starts to dry out. Cook to desired consistency, adjusting to taste.

Salsa Verde
Goes well on burritos and tacos. All amounts in this recipe are approximate (even more so than than my other recipes as I'm not writing this while making it).

1.5-2 lbs of tomatillos, peeled, cleaned, and chopped
1-2 medium onions, finely chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
jalapenos to desired heat, finely chopped
2-3 t oregano
1/3 c white vinegar
1/2 C lime juice
half bunch of cilantro, cleaned, stems removed, and chopped
Splash of olive oil
small handful of sugar
Salt
1 bayleaf

Saute the onions and garlic in the olive oil until translucent; add the jalapenos and cook for another few minutes. Add all ingredients except cilantro, with enough water to cover. Simmer slowly for an hour or so, adding water if it starts to dry out. Remove the bayleaf and puree (either with a stick blender or a food processor). Cook to desired consistency, and during the last 5-10 minutes of cooking add the cilantro and adjust the seasoning to taste.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

A nice easy one here.

Crab Rangoon, serve with sweet and sour sauce (following).
8 oz cream cheese
8 oz crab
1 t red onion, chopped
1/2 t worchestershire
1/2 t soy sauce
1 green onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 t sesame oil
wonton wrappers

add ingredients, put in wrappers, fry (360-375 degrees).

Sweet and sour sauce:
3/4 C unsweetened pineapple juice
3/4 C vinegar
3/4 C sugar
6 T ketsup
3 t cornstarch
1/4 C soy sauce

Mix all ingredients, cook over medium heat stirring until the mixture comes to a boil and the sauce is clear.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

OMG,I love theses things. Anytime I go out for Chinese food I always /always/ get these (speaking of which, a girl from high school still owes me an order of these from the local Chinese place out where I graduated from. Oh well.) Now I really want to scare up a deep fryer (wait- would a deep sauce pan and a candy thermometer to help regulate the temp work?) Eeeeee!!! Thank you for posting this

Davik's picture

Embodiment

It's easy enough to make these in a skillet or pot (know I've used a deep cast iron skillet before). In general, since the inside doesn't really have to "cook", the oil temperature doesn't matter that much unless you get it either really too cold (which makes it soggy) or really too hot (which burns it). Make sure a bread crumb or piece of wrapper sizzles when it goes it, and make sure the oil isn't smoking. Don't overload the pan. If you follow that, these will be as good as any you've ever had, though you may want to play around a little with folding geometry as you do it (I've used the simple corner to corner triangle fold and the corner to corner, OTHER corner to corner to create a square base with four seams going to the corners).

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Yet another PS:
If you have specific recipes you want, feel free to ask. I may post something along the lines of "I don't know what the hell that is", but in general I have a hell of a lot of the classics written up, and a hundred or two I've never bothered to type up. Anything beyond that I can treat as an experiment Smile This brings up the Agedashi tofu I posted earlier, which I had made in a different form (fry it the same way, but instead of the Japanese dashi sauce, use Thai sweet chili sauce).

Also, at some point in here I'll post my potsticker recipe; it took me years to get this to the same standard my favorite chinese restaurant had them, but I think I've finally gotten it (and without dating the owner's daughter... ).

magalicious's picture

Postulant

you're trying to kill me.
I love crab rangoon so hard. I do have a deep fryer/basket setup somewhere, but it's such a pain in the tuchus to clean that I usually end up using a standard pot when I fry things - but I've never made crab rangoon!
Also, you totally should post the potsticker recipe! I love shumai!

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Alright, I'll call it quits for a little while after this one.

Stuffed grape leaves as taught to me by my Egyptian roommate back in undergrad. Easily the best I've ever had.

1 large jar grape leaves
~2 lbs non-lean ground beef; get the cheap stuff with 20% fat
2-3 C uncooked basmati rice
salt to taste
one or two potatoes
Garlic, Lots and lots of garlic cut in to large slices.

Sauce:
Plain yogurt
cucumber
garlic
dried mint

Mix the beef with rice (roughly equal amounts by volume, maybe slightly heavier on the beef) and salt.

Cut the potatoes in slices and layer the bottom of a large pot with them; the purpose of the potatoes is only to keep the grape leaves from sticking to the bottom of the pot.

Rinse the grape leaves and cut off the small piece of stem. Most of the grape leaves will be big enough to cut in to 2 pieces (3 for large leaves, but the smaller the piece you cut the harder it is to roll). A small amount of the beef and rice mixture should be put in to the center of the piece of leaf and rolled so that it forms a stuffed cylinder approximately 5-6 cm in length and 2 cm or less in diameter. The filling should be completely wrapped in leaf so it doesn't leak out while cooking. Do this for all the grape leaves and filling, placing them in the pot in circles so that they form solid layers of grape leaves. When a layer is complete put 8-10 large slices of garlic on the layer, then top with a layer of unstuffed grape leaves. Continue doing this for as many layers as it takes to use all the stuffing and grape leaves. When this is done, you'll need some way to evenly apply pressure to the surface of the grape leaves and keep them packed down; I typically use a plate that fits inside the pot with a large bowl full of water set on top to hold it down. Pour water inside the pot to cover the grape leaves and place it on the stove over low to medium heat (you want it to come to a very low simmer). You'll have to add water occasionally as it is absorbed by the rice in the grape leaves, and cook until the rice is done (don't be afraid to pull one of the stuffed grape leaves out occasionally to check, but it will take more than an hour). When the rice and the meat are done remove the pot from the stove and drain any excess water. The grape leaves themselves are done.

Sauce:
Remove the seeds from the cucumber and finely chop it. Mince the garlic, and add it and the cucumber to the yogurt. Grind the dried mint if it isn't already and add to the yogurt. Allow it to sit. Proportions on this vary by taste, but keep in mind the garlic taste will intensify with time (it might taste just right an hour after making it but be completely overpowering two days later with the leftovers). The sauce should sit for at least an hour, but if you plan on letting it sit over night, go a little light on the garlic because the flavor will develop with time.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Okay, it's time to bump this thread again (oh, and I have enough recipes to keep doing this for the foreseeable future as long as I don't get bored). This time, I'm going to post a handful of southern food recipes, and I've got to thank my dad and/or grandmother for most of these.

Split pea soup:

1 1/2 cups quick cooking split green peas (I use a 1 lb bag. Rinse them and check for rocks.)
1 ham bone (or ham hock, so you can trim off the meat and add it at the end)
2/3 cup coarsely chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped carrot
1/2 cup chopped celery
2 parsley sprigs
1 clove garlic
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cans (14 oz ) chicken broth
1 cup siivered cooked ham (I use ham hocks instead of a ham bone and then cut the meat off of them)

1. In a 3 1/2 quart kettle combine peas and 1 qt of water; bring to boiling. Reduce heatand simmer covered for 45 minutes. Add water if necessary.
2. Add all the rest of the ingredients except the ham. Simmer covered for 1 1/2 hours. (I just cook it until everything breaks up.)
3. Remove ham bone and discard. (Or remove ham hocks and cut the meat off of them,)
4. Press vegetables and liquid through a coarse sieve.
5. Return to kettle. Add ham and reheat slowly.

Green beans:
This is a real easy one, but it's real approximate as I'm just now writing it, though it is very forgiving.

1 lb green beans
1 small onion, quartered and sliced
a little veggie oil
a ham hock
salt and pepper to taste

Snap the ends of the beans as usual. Lightly saute the onion, add the rest of the ingredients as well as enough water to simmer. Simmer slowly for a couple of hours, until the beans are soft. Trim the meat from the ham hock and return to the pot. Beans should be strained for eating, and are ever better the next day.

Garlic mashed potatoes:
I'm not sure how southern this is as it was a spontaneous creation that I'm just now writing down after the fact, but it goes well with your typical southern food. It is however more of a sketchy outline than a recipe.

Half and half or cream
romano cheese
potatoes
celery seed
butter
garlic or garlic powder
salt and pepper to taste

Boil the potatoes as you would for normal mashed potatoes, meanwhile, either saute minced garlic in butter or melt butter with garlic powder depending on your choice of garlic forms; if using minced garlic, don't take beyond light golden brown. Mash the potatoes with the garlic butter, salt, pepper, lots of romano, cream, and a heavy dash of celery seed (this is the secret ingredient). It's better if you can use a stand mixer to get a whipped consistency to the potatoes.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

is gooooood eats. Loves me some grits for instance.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Okay, so generally I've been posting fairly complicated recipes, and it occurred to me that I had a big hit that anyone can make. I was active with both the pro-choice and feminist groups back at Purdue, and every time I made these for their bake sales they sold out in nothing flat. All you need is:

A cupcake pan
paper or foil cup cake liners
package of brownie mix along with everything to make it according to directions
bunch of reese's cups

Put the liners in the pan, add about half the brownie mix you normally would too fill the liner. Dump in a reese's cup (remember to take the paper off!), then add the rest of the brownie mix. Cook according to directions, and check with a tooth pick to make sure you have it done (might take longer to cook).

magalicious's picture

Postulant

You are trying to kill me.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

If I was trying to kill you I'd post my cheese cake recipe Smile

magalicious's picture

Postulant

Then I'd have to dig around for my mom's chocolate orange cheesecake recipe. This is a vicious cycle, Davik. Wink

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

Chocolate Orange Cheesecake? That sounds delicious, now I want to know (even though I've never made a cheese cake in my life it sounds delicious. ^-^

BCT's picture

Devotee

When I was little my mom sent me to kids cooking classes at Gelson's, one of our favorite grocery stores. I've had this recipe from the first class I took for a looooong time now, and it's still one of the best things I've ever tasted. Helpfully separated into mis en place:

Tomato Bisque Soup

½ stick unsalted butter
¾ cup chopped celery
½ cup chopped carrots
3 big shallots, chopped
3 tbs arrowroot

5 large ripe roma tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp basil
1 bay leaf
2 cups chicken broth

1 ½ cups whipping cream
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp curry powder
¼ tsp pepper

1) Saute celery, carrots, and shallots in butter until tender.
2) Add arrowroot and cook, stirring for two minutes.
3) Add tomatoes, sugar, basil, bay leaf, and chicken broth. Cover saucepan and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring on occasion.
4) Remove bay leaf. Puree the mixture in three parts, either in a blender or food processor.
5) Add cream, paprika, curry powder, and pepper. Add salt to taste.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

That actually sounds really good (better than any of the stuff I learned when I took cooking classes as a kid), though I may save this to a text file until the summer when I can use heirloom tomatoes from my own garden.

PS: Recipe saved until I can make it with really fresh tomatoes and do it justice (make it some where in the sequence of gazpacho and bruschetta that you just have to make with truly fresh tomatoes). I never actually liked raw tomato until I grew my own, though the heirlooms from the farmers market in california were at least as good.

BCT's picture

Devotee

I

I'll be in my bunk.

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

I wish my dorm had a kitchen so I could make some of these tasty things. I really miss being able to cook my own food Blush

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I'm bored, so here's another, though there aren't any amounts for the ingredients, just use your judgment.

1 Flank steak
Pesto
olive oil
dry sherry
romano cheese
salt
pepper

Butterfly the flank steak to half thickness, then lightly season with salt and
pepper. Smear one side of the flank steak generously with pesto, and dust lightly
with grated romano. Roll the flank steak up with the pesto inside and the grain of
the meat running axially, and tie with butcher's twine. Heat the oil in an
oven-proof skillet until very hot; add the steak and sear on all sides. Don't
worry if some of the pesto falls out; if none of it does, add a teaspoon or two of
the pesto directly to the oil. When the steak is seared on all sides put the
entire skillet, steak and all, in a 350 degree oven until it reaches desired
doneness. Remove if from the oven, remove the steak and wrap in aluminum foil to rest. Meanwhile, heat the skillet over medium high heat, then deglaze with dry
sherry or brandy. Adjust the pan sauce for seasoning. Slice the meat across the
grain into 1-1.5 cm thick slices, and pour the pan sauce on top. A possible
addition is a sprinkling of bread crumbs on the pesto side of the beef before
rolling.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

A wonderful starter for a chinese meal, serve with something like ma po tofu and rice for a hell of a meal.

Pot Stickers (Gyoza) and Dipping Sauce
All quantities are approximate, adjust to taste.

1 lb Ground pork
Cabbage (to taste, usually several leaves)
4 Green Onions
rice wine (chinese style)
soy sauce
1/4-1/2 t sugar
sesame oil
flour
water
4 cloves garlic
1 cm fresh ginger

Filling:
Chop cabbage into thin strips, finely mince garlic, grate ginger, and finely chop
green onion. Mix the cabbage, ginger, and approximately half of both the garlic
and green onion with the ground pork. Add a splash (between 1 t and 1 T) of
soysauce, sesame oil, and soy sauce to the pork; mix and set aside.

Sauce:
In a small bowl combine soy sauce (1/3 C), rice wine (1-2 T), sesame oil (1/2-1 T),
sugar, and remaining garlic and green onion. Allow to sit for at least 1 hour

(preferably over-night).

Dough:
Flour, salt and water to appropriate consistency.

Tear off small pieces of dough and flatten by hand into circles approximately 5 cm
in diameter, place filling in the middle and seal the edges of the dough together
making sure to completely seal the filling inside. Repeat many, many times until
all the filling is used.
Steam the pot stickers until the pork is cooked (approximately 10-15 minutes but
cut into one to make sure it is done). Heat a small amount of oil in a skillet and
place the steamed pot stickers in the skillet, cooking on one side until the bottom
is crispy and golden brown.

magalicious's picture

Postulant

Yayness! And that's right - steam, then fry!

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Lentil and Rice Soup, middle eastern style, as cloned from the best middle eastern restaurant in the area.

1 T olive oil
2 large onions, chopped
1 small hot pepper, finely chopped (or whole dried chile, removed before serving)
8 c chicken stock (veggie stock for vegetarians)
2 c toor dal, rinsed (or other split lentils)
1 t cumin
2 t ground coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Pinch of saffron
2 T white rice, uncooked

salt to taste

Heat oil in a saucepan and sauté onions and hot pepper over medium heat for 10 minutes. Add remaining ingredients, except lemon juice, and bring to boil. Cover and simmer for an hour or until the lentils are soft. Puree; then return to saucepan and reheat. Stirring in a little lemon juice at the end is optional (I usually don't).

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I have enough friends in the vegan and vegetarian camps that I've put together a few recipes for them, this one is Vegetable Lentil Soup. This is an early pass at it, so plenty of modification is welcome, and if you find something that really helps it let me know. Substituting broth for water is one option.

2 onions, finely chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 carrots, chopped
3-5 stalks celery, chopped
2 potatoes (yukon gold or similar), diced (peeling optional)
1 leek, split, cleaned, and chopped
12-16 oz lentils
salt
pepper
thyme
2 bay leaves
splash red wine vinegar

Saute onions and garlic, combine all but vinegar with water to appropriate, simmer for hours, about 30 minutes before done, add vinegar.

Add new comment

Get an exclusive free ebook from the world of the Intimate History! Exclusive content, contests, new releases and more.