Accents

I'm making binders, and thus have free reign of the computer- so I'm goin' on a little posting spree... Smile

So, accents. I have a pretty standard educated, middle class, midwest accent, with bits of east coast when I get emotional- and I use "ironic" slang.

What do you have?

And, what do you like?

This has been on my mind, because Southern accents have slowly transitioned from "annoying, uncultured" to "lovely, smooth" and I now love listening to a Texan drawl...

Is your accent-opinion altered by the people with that accent?

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MeiLin's picture

Most High

It actually saddens me that American accents are all smoothing out into one big puddle of West Coast Neutral, as it's called. My accent is essentially West Coast Neutral, but when I get excited or tired I lapse into the blindingly fast, dipthong-filled accent of my youth, which came to be called "Valleyspeak," but which actually started at least 10 years earlier in the beach cities of LA, where I grew up. (The valley kids were always coming to the beach and copying everything.) Never said "gag me with a spoon," but "totally" was totally there. (Sir says the more excitable I get these days, the more I sound like Hurley--"dude.")

I am totally fascinated by British accents. What a multitude of variations on English pronunciation, all packed into one pretty damn small island! I sure hope they're not all melting into a big puddle of Received Pronunciation. That would be exceedingly sad.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

I have a good friend who is a huge nerd about English accents He can usually pin point city, and when I try to call him on it, and check- he's always right. But it's really annoying when he's saying things like "Probably grew up in the North, but living in London now." or "Liverpool, but pretending to be..."

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... your friend needs to meet. He's got the most fucked up mix of British accents I've ever come across. There's both Liverpudlian and, IIRC, Manchester in there somewhere, which alone mean that he's nigh unintelligible, and it just goes downhill from there. }:)

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

MeiLin wrote:
It actually saddens me that American accents are all smoothing out into one big puddle of West Coast Neutral, as it's called.<snip>

I am totally fascinated by British accents. What a multitude of variations on English pronunciation, all packed into one pretty damn small island! I sure hope they're not all melting into a big puddle of Received Pronunciation. That would be exceedingly sad.

... though it seems to have gotten a bit smaller due to the increased mobility, is still alive and well. Besides, RP seems to be on the decline. The new standard tends towards more of a London/SE England working class accent (though not Cockney), apparently because it's perceived as friendlier than RP (which seems to have acquired a bit of a stuck up image).

Anyway, I'm always kinda amused by how much store Americans put into their local accents when to my ear, and especially compared to the sheer variety and variability present in the UK, they all sound so similar I'm barely able to distinguish between Southern, West Coast, Midwest and Northeastern accents, let alone make out any finer subdivisions...

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... as well as some of the British accents (Southeastern ones mostly. Scottish accents can be cozy once you've tuned your ears for them). Most American accents do nothing for me one way or the other, although I find some of the Southern mannerisms and vocabulary endearing. I dislike most foreign language accents, and I utterly hate English spoken with a German accent.

That said, what I have is this (2 MB mp3 of me answering accent-oriented questions, mostly about word choices).

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

It's really neat to hear you talk. I've seen pictures of you, so that kind of helps fill out the picture of what it would be like to meet you. Smile Now if only I knew what you smelled like, I think I'd be there. Wink It seems like you use most of the same words I do, even if you definitely have a different accent when you say some of them.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... send you my used underwear, so it seems like you'll have to do without the olfactory impressions for now. Blum 3

My accent is a bit weird, I admit. There's some British influence, as that's what I learned at school, some standard American and possibly a tiny bit of Aussie because that's where the podcasts are from which I listen to during my 10 hours of commuting each week, and there's also still some influence of my native German, despite my best efforts to rid myself of that.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

Don't worry about it. Honestly, unless you're planning on acting professionally, the effort to change an accent isn't worth it, and it sounds... odd. The way you speak is quite nice, and don't worry about the German coming through, it's cute. I know someone who was really worried about having a Bulgarian accent, so he'd type American TV shows and movies, and such, and listen to them, and try to mimick them, and now when I talk with him he just sounds... weird. Not American, not Bulgarian, just kind of "wrong", and you can tell he's trying -really- hard.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... or at least I mostly don't. Smile I'm aware of how hard it is to get rid of some of those ingrained speech patterns, and I'm not willing to expend that much time and energy on it. Besides, with the variety of English accents out there, there's bound to be one or two which feature those speech patterns anyway. Wink Also, I'm not trying to mimic any particular accent, mostly because I'm convinced I'd just sound fake if I did.

As I said, I hate English with a German accent, so my goal is primarily getting to a point where the first reaction of someone hearing me talk isn't "Oh, so you're from Germany". And I think I'm mostly there, or at least as much as I can be without getting a couple months of full immersion. Which isn't going to happen in the foreseeable future.

Marri's picture

Supplicant

Talking to people on a forum means I always picture them having the same accent as me (even though of course they don't). I can't place yours; sometimes it even sounds British? I believe I will settle on "I approve" Blum 3

Mith's picture

Supplicant

Yeeeee

That made me really happy, because 1) as an answer to "what's your accent?" it's above and beyond perfect, 2) after I read your description I was intrigued, and mostly 3) I couldn't listen it until now (I don't like playing things with sound at work, and I limit my "fucking around on the web" time to weekends, or to on my ipod. ...which wouldn't play it.)

So that was very exciting.

Thank you.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... how to describe my accent (apart from listing the potential influences as I did above) and I had this mp3 lying around anyway (it's about a year old), I figured posting the mp3 was the best solution to contributing to this thread.

I'm glad you enjoyed it.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

It's definitely tempting me to make me one... but I don't have time. And I won't.

I will have will power!

But I do think it's cool to be able to 'hear' someone on the web... like um, Marri said, I just imagine everyone with my voice. Or the one I hear when I'm thinking, rather, not the one played back on answering machines or video tapes. (I almost said my "head" voice, but then realized where I was.)

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... then downloading Audacity, recording the mp3, uploading it somewhere and linking it here takes no more than 15 minutes total for a quick'n'dirty job. Thirty, if you've never used Audacity before and your internet connection sucks.

Come on. You know you want to. Smile

Mith's picture

Supplicant

That took way more time than expected. But eh. I also kind of sound like a tard. Ah well. So it goes. I sort of did my "la, I'm so smart, and proper, la la la" so when talking to my friends I slur a bit more, swear, use rude slang... etc.

(Also sounding weirdly girly? That's not how I sound in my head.)

And because I suck at the internet, you may have to download it.

http://www.supload.com/sound_confirm.php?get=1389043945.wav

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... I could stand hearing more from tards. Blum 3 You've got a very pleasant voice, Mith. Also, weirdly girly? Nope. Definitely female, yes, but not girly. At least not to my ears. (Also, I sound completely different in my head than when I hear a recording of my voice, so yeah, I understand the Huh? reaction.)

The list of words you pronounce differently was interesting. That gave your otherwise American accent a slight British vibe which I quite liked.

Thanks for taking the time to record and post that.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

In my head my voice is lower and a little... Well, I'm not sure, buy it's always a surprise to hear something else :/

I'm not sure where my non-American accent comes from- but I talked to my brother an apparently I used to sound really weird. From pre school until first grade I went to a school where the headmistress, and my teacher, was Irish, and had a strong Irish accent, and I apparently liked to talk lie her. Combine that with the fact we lived in rural Maine... I guess I sounded pretty silly for a while. Then we moved to california and everyone made fun of me, and I lost most of what ever cool thing I had.

...stupid kids.

Anyway, it was actually a lot of fun trying to think about my own accent/voice, because it's really something don't often think of.

Stormy's picture

Supplicant

here, with touches of Oklahoma-style-southern. And I say y'all. A LOT.

Like many American chicks, Irish & Scottish accents make me swoon.

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

People have a hard time placing where I'm from. I drag out vowels like a southerner sometimes. If I'm talking to someone with a different accent for any length of time I start to pick it up. If I am speaking very animatedly the Rochester (new york) accent comes out, which is a tamer version of a Minnesota accent. Slightly nasal, with the odd pronunciation of the long "o" sound. Also if I'm speaking animatedly, the flow of my words is sort of halting and slurred. My friend Sam says I sound like Hunter S. Thompson (think Johnny Depp in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Thompson based the character on himself) when that happens.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

I subconciously do that accent mimcry some times too- but uh, apparently that's erm, well, offensive to some people... I learned... The harder way. So I try not to, but it's really... natural to do it. I still mimick speech patterns though. If I talk with someone who speaks slowly, I do too, or someone who uses excessivly pretensious word choice? Yep, my very lexicon is mutable and... reflective?

Stormy's picture

Supplicant

the long 'o'...as soon as I saw Minnesota in your post, I heard Minnesoooooooooota in my head (we had a friend from Minnesota in college and that was kind of his rallying cry at parties. Another friend was from Chicago, so you would hear calls of shi-kaaaaaaaaaaa-go late into the night).

Clare-Dragonfly's picture

Supplicant

...a Philadelphia accent. "Mary," "marry," and "merry" all have different vowel sounds, and I say "wooder."

I think New Zealand accents are basically the awesomest ever.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

"He may be dead."
"He maybe did what?"
"He may be -dead-."
"I know, but what did he maybe do?"
"He may be dead!"
"Yeah, maybe he did, maybe he didn't. what did he maybe do?"
"No, he may be dead."
"Are you guys fucking with me?"

tee-hee, I love fotc. But they are the only reason I can tell the differnce between new zealander and Aussie, in all truth.

Pikachu42's picture

Embodiment

at least to my ears southern accent. However, if I'm around someone with a heavy accent, the heavier mine becomes LOL.

I love accents, and have the ability to pick them up easily. I wanna learn slang from different cultures to make them more believable. Right now the accents I like the most are English, French, and Australian.

Kittae's picture

Postulant

Ditto here. My grandma kinda insisted that I learn "good" English and not have an accent so people wouldn't assume I was stupid. But I use "ya'll" waaaay too much. But coming home to family brings it out. Or, weirdly enough, when I was in highschool the beginning French classes made the accent come out real bad for everyone. = P

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

accents didn't affect me, but they really do. I feel like accents help generalize a group of people, and that's not necessarily a good thing. That said, Scottish accents are my favorite, followed by Irish. Working class British is more pleasing to my ear than middle class or aristocratic British accents. I find Indian accents kind of comforting, but really hate trying to figure out what a Chinese person is saying. Russian (and all slavic languages, really) always sounded kind of savage in a hot sort of way. Anything Hispanic/Spanish/Italian/Portugese is really hot. French is not (despite my love of the country itself), except for that one waitress in Bordeaux, who I wanted to take home with me.

According to a survey I just took, I have no accent (or a Midland accent), although it's possible that I say a few words a little funny. I don't really like the way any American accents sound. Southern accents are pretty unappealing. Boston is less than awesome, as is New York. My dad has a Southwest US accent, and that doesn't really bother me. Most West Coast accents are fine with me too, but most of the city accents and Southern accents I find kind of annoying.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

Because of Sam Beam, mostly, I have revised my opinion on southern accents.

French is one of those weird ones... It's almost a parody of itself sometimes. It seems like French American accents are more pleasing than French British. Softer, almost.

applejax's picture

Supplicant

of a Boston accent, but mostly because I've started dropping my r's since I've lived here, and I've always talked much too fast. I also say "wicked" now without thinking about it, and people from my hometown think that's pretty strange.

I really enjoy any kind of accent that isn't difficult to understand; British, Australian, New Zealand, etc. I have a professor who is from the Ukraine, and his accent drives me insane. Not that I don't appreciate the diversity, I just really can't tell what he's trying to say sometimes. I do like southern accents most of the time, just not the ones that sound like "trailer trash" as opposed to just a nice drawl. And a very strong Long Island accent can just make my ears hurt. But half the time when I hear that I think it's on purpose.

Marri's picture

Supplicant

I'm from New York, but don't have a "New York" accent (which is mostly Brooklyn, anyway). The last few times I've asked people where they think I'm from by accent, they've said Iowa. Erm?

I do say y'all, though. It's useful! Confused the hell out of my (mostly southern) roommates this summer; I normally sounded like your average college kid, and then there'd be the occasional "HEY Y'ALL, COME EAT, I'M HUNGRY."

I suppose part of the problem is that I absorb accents. By the end of two weeks in England, I was starting to sound British. I did the same thing when I was visiting Texas. It doesn't apply to other languages, sadly, but I can get varieties of English relatively quickly. Haven't figured out Australian ones yet...

I'm a fan of a lot of accents. British, Irish, Scottish, Australian, New Zealand, South Africa (off the top of my head). As long as I can understand what they're saying, I probably like the accent Smile

blwinteler's picture

Supplicant

I am fairly neutral. I don't have any specific regional accent. If I am around someone with an accent, I pick it up. I especially pick up from Hawaiians and Hispanics, having grown up in HI and lived in Mexico for a little bit and majoring in Spanish for a couple years. I joked to David once that it would be very weird to be around both Hawaiians and Hispanics at the same time. Then, a couple weeks later, I was at a party for a friend of Adam's, a little Hispanic girl, and a Hawaiian family shows up. Sure enough, I picked up on both. (actually, turns out the Hawaiian family owns the ranch land behind my high school, on which I have trespassed)
Anyway, love all accents, but I'm particularly fond of Australian and British accents. Also Irish, Scottish, and so on. I just love language, and accents are a big part of that.

The Paperclip's picture

I generally speak in a somewhat more refined Midwestern accent. Meaning I tend to fully form words than dropping syllables and such. That's the way it was described to me. For some reason, I also have a tendency to slip into some sort of Southern accent. I pick up on accents easily, though, and if I watch a lot of movies from England, I'll find myself slipping into whatever accents I find in there, or the like. Makes it very useful in acting. I'm currently in "The Little Foxes," which takes place in turn of the century Alabama, and it was no trouble at all for me to pick up on the accent. We open tomorrow night, and there are still a few actors who are still talking like Iowans.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

I think most people easily pick up accents when they're exposed to them in any sort of significant way. It makes as a sort of survival instinct for social critters like us.

I'm mostly American neutral, although the western NY/Greater Rochester area accent does show up occasionally, usually in a nasal "a" every now and then. My maternal family is from rural-suburban Georgia, so I grew up with some Southern influence in accent and turns of phrase, so those come easily to me, too.

Kaisar Ryu's picture

Petitioner

Growing up everywhere, speaking with many people from everywhere, tended to muddle my accent into what is usualy thought of a midwest, though people who have that naturaly usualy pin me as more southern. Outside that, I tend to subconciously adjust to whomever I speak with over a short to mid period of time. The more time I spend around someone, the more I will sould like them accentwise, which can get odd if I switch my conversation to another individual and an observer gets a bit of a different earfull just minutes later. This info, though, is secondhand to me. I have trouble hearing any sort of an accent in my own voice, and rarely notice its own sound.

Amy's picture

Supplicant

was once driven to distraction by my weird accents. I tend to absorb them while hearing, or reading them. and they all start coming out during a long conversation. Different phrases get different accents. Add in my Native American influences and you have a very confused dialectitian.

As long as I manage to make myself understood. It's all good IMO.

I love a good Scot's or Irish brogue though, or an Australian Burr.

gossamerblade's picture

I grew up in central Ga. so naturally, I have a bit of a southern drawl.

My mom always emphasized clear enunciation; she didn't want us to sound like backwoods hicks. Since she's from Greece, and only had a smattering of English when she moved to the U.S., she has an odd accent and has to put some effort into correct pronunciation of words.

My husband, who grew up in the suburbs of Atlanta, has a much more pronounced southern accent. He tries to tone it down, especially when he's talking to clients (tech support for a software company), but he says that people who comment on his accent seem to like his drawl. (I guess if they didn't like it, they wouldn't comment!)

minnow's picture

... with a particular malleability toward US southern and UK accents from hearing them so much growing up. I have relatives in Texas who used to call regularly, and I grew up on brit-coms. I also came back from my visit to Scotland with a very odd apparently Irish-like accent that came from hearing all the different British and Scottish accents while traveling.

I'm very fond of the accents that I naturally take on when I hear them, plus I'm actually very fond of Indian and Iraqi accents.

I liked the accent before I liked the teacher with the accent, so I don't think my like or dislike of an accent has to do with the like or dislike of the people with those accents. There are people who I find perfectly lovely with accents that, to me, sound a lot like a braying donkey, and me liking them doesn't change that.

greatmediocrity's picture

Devotee

I grew up and still live in the Pittsburgh area. I don't speak full-on Pittsburghese, though. It's falling out of favor with the younger generations who essentially don't want to sound as blue-collar as their parents do.

For example, while people with a thicker accent here pronounce "house" as hahs, no ow sound, I get it...if not right, at least closer. I don't say "yinz" or add "n'at" to ends of sentences. People (from elsewhere, never from here) have said I sound like Jimmy Stewart. I suppose that's kind of close, because his accent wasn't terribly thick, either.

Some videos for you. Keep in mind that the WDVE ones are slightly exaggerated. Unfortunately, it's only slight:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEyJjAAPy38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WLEglxTOMY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNKGzlq481A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umR5jj6Q9JM

And finally, an abridged video dictionary:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6Q4fsRFcuc

I find these hilarious, but I'm from here, so I would. Smile

mendacity's picture

General Midwest for me when I am speaking properly. However, when I am around my mom's side of the family or when I am speaking to people from my hometown I generally find my speech thickened with a southwestern-type pronounciation and vocabulary. It's not a Jekyll/Hyde difference or anything, just a little more than subtle. Now that I've taken five semesters of Russian language classes, I find myself wanting to use Russian-type phrases in English, like "what-what?" (Russian- что-что? meaning, beg pardon? what did you say? i'm sorry?--that type of phrase-thing).

As far as understanding other accents, it's not too hard for me because of all the foreign teachers I had in my high school. As far as the difficult ones, besides Russian I probably understand Chinese accents the best. Indian next, but it takes me a minute to get into the rhythm of it.

The many UK accents-adorable. I like German, primarily because of Til Lindemann. French is alright, depending on the speaker (sexy French guys in RUSS 1115-where did you go? My libido went with you) but I don't care for the language itself. I don't very much care for Middle East and Indian accents in English, although I will say most of the Indian accents I hear are soothing somehow. They're rhythmic or something. The voice changes on alternate syllables. Japanese makes me think cute, although how much of that is a bias because of anime, kawaii things, and all that, I don't know. Australian--definitely sexy. All rugged-like. Hugh Jackman. Hispanic accents are interesting. I like the way Native Americans (the older ones) talk. It's not that there's an accent so much as a manner of speaking. To my ear it's just slightly different than what I usually hear.

Mith's picture

Supplicant

I say "dobre" (too lazy to get up the cyrillic for it) in conversation like that. And all my friends and I say wonderfully uh, not racist, but like phrases with really bad fake accents? "Vondahbah" or "Queees-qua?" and occasionally "sacabunta" (which means pencil sharpener) in sillyness... it's rather fun to integrate non-english words into english conversation.

I live in an area with a lot of Native Americans, and the Res accent has lost all charm for me, I associate it with poverty, smoking, poor education and fry bread- and the line for Smoke Circles "Hey, Victor!".

Veritas's picture

I grew up on the east coast of Canada, in Nova Scotia. When I moved to the inland, I didn't notice a huge difference, except that people didn't have quite the right rhythm to their speech, spoke a bit slower, but that was all I really heard that was different. I was told, though, that I had an odd lilt and rhythm, and when I got really cranky, I apparently sounded a bit Scottish. I also used English cuss words. While I'd love to attribute that to my heritage, I never met the real Scots or Irish in my family, but I've noticed now that the Maritimes, particularly Nova Scotia, seem to have held on to more of the Scottish and other UK accents, but they've blended into a strange little mix. I've lost a lot of it, over the years, and developed a more neutral mainland speaking tone, but whenever I get excited/emotional, it comes right back out in full strength.

I'm very fond of the Scottish burr, especially after going to Scotland. It's just familiar enough to my ear to not need to really think about what's being said, but with enough of a foreign and pleasing turn to it that it has that lovely air of 'different'.

Pedes's picture

Postulant

I was kind of forced to get a nice accent at university but at the moment I'm on the international exchange and I'm so under influence of other people I think all this went down through the drain and I have crap accent now and German is f*cking up my grammar...

You can hear how I sound now here http://www.ustream.tv/channel/world-of-p although I'm still really uncomfortable with the microphone (And I don't have a lisp, I guess the microphone likes the S sound...) and please ignore the bad grammar XD

I love the sound of British accents. Also we have a guy from Australia here and I absolutely ADORE his accent.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... as you make it out to be. Interestingly, to my ear your accent seems to wander a bit. I mostly get a generic Slavic accent (not so much specifically Polish, which I find interesting because I normally find Polish rather identifiable), but sometimes you sound vaguely French or even Italian.

Pedes's picture

Postulant

I can get pretty nice semi-british accent... if I pay attention to do it. But in the evening streaming when my mind is half in drawing.. not so much XD

Haha, I have French and Italian roommates so that is possible that I'm under the influence. Also I've been so confused, for some reason German words kept popping into my mind XD

laureril (who is having log-in issues)'s picture

People can usually disqualify me from the more extreme accents spoken by Americans (Most of the North Eastern dialects, LA, Midwest, Deep South, Appalachian) but they can't quite figure out where I'm from. I pretty much speak General American with a little bit of Southern thrown in.

I prefer 'y'all' or occasionally 'you all' over 'you guys', 'coke' over 'pop' or 'soda', 'couch' over 'sofa', I'll pick 'idea,' 'wash,' and 'car' over 'idear,' 'warsh,' or 'cah' any day. I don't naturally distinguish 'pen' and 'pin,' but since I'm a linguist I've learned to, likewise for 'caught' and 'cot.' I do have a tendency toward diphthongs over monophthongs. But, even though I'm from Texas, I don't have a noticeable draw.

Actually, if you leave me around my extended family in Eastern Kentucky for too long, I get to talking like them by using constructions like 'get to' when I mean 'start.'

JeVoudraisCake's picture

Supplicant

I have one of those shifting accents. In my experience it changes just enough so that whomever I'm talking to reckons I'm not from around these parts. Friends in the country will deride my well-spoken English, acquaintances from East Anglia chuckle at my Irish brougue. When I worked on reception in a busy health centre, the best guess was that I was from Zimbabwe.

And for some reason, whenever I talk to a newsagent (specifically newsagents), they tentatively guess that I'm from New Zealand, in a manner which suggests that they're almost sure I'm Australian, but they didn't want to guess Australian in case I somehow take offence.

And the irony is that I was born in Wales, but I can only manage a fairly poor Welsh lilt. Sad

Posting a recording would be meaningless, as I would sound different in the flesh. Might do it, though, if another couple Historians come forward, thereby generating a bandwagon...

Mith's picture

Supplicant

Hey hey- you'd be number three! And really, do you want to be a follower, or one of the originals!?

Do it!

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... the spirit! Smile

JeVoudraisCake's picture

Supplicant

OK, at the risk of resurrecting an old thread and generating a bandwagon, I submit my voice.

It's me reading the text of "Left his Nurse while in a Crowd" as rendered on BPAL's site. Found it there after Mei's Naughty/Nice blog post, and I liked it so much that I thought I'd read it in. Text is at

http://www.blackphoenixtradingpost.com/naughtynice2009.html

and I am here, in all my melodrama, at:

http://www.supload.com/listen?s=yNOsGL

So that's Mith and Gudy, greatmediocrity and Pedes and now me!

I know the thread is rather long, but surely we can grow it just a little more! Speak, speak!

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... of reading material, there. I approve. Smile

Also, whoever came up with the ideas about you being from Australia or New Zealand, let alone Zimbabwe?! That's quite clearly a British accent you have there.

JeVoudraisCake's picture

Supplicant

Only hours ago I was getting a haircut. Hairdresser reckons I'm from South Africa, won't believe me when I tell her I grew up 30 miles down the road. I do copy elements of the accents of other people despite my best efforts. I suppose belfast crossed with my own must be South African! I wouldn't have said so, but I get it all the time. Smile

Mith's picture

Supplicant

I heard british too... I might be going to my nerd-y accent friends house this afternoon, and I'll see if he wants to try and place you.

I do notice something different than I would expect, for instance in "jam" and hmm, something else, "eaten", maybe. Your nasal sounds, I suppose.

So I'd been thinking of doing a poem as well, but decided against it, as when I read poetry I do a... I don't know, elevated language thing.

I would have done Shelley though, I think... *sigh* Shelley...

Also, Mei, have you ever thought of doing the History as a podcast? One of the other erotic authors I read (Remittance Girl) does podcasts fairly often, and it's cool. Or perhaps, it might be fun, for us Historians to do some. Then we could show where we are from, and also have a bit of fun.

It'd be like a quilt!

A quilt of accents!

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

Mith wrote:
Also, Mei, have you ever thought of doing the History as a podcast?

... to do exactly that. She's also been a voice guest on an erotic story podcast some time ago. I think it was Nobilis Erotica, but I'm not sure.

JeVoudraisCake's picture

Supplicant

But in sincerity, I wouldn't want to start poking at Mei's creative direction. She has politely asked us not to do fanfic, after all.

I'm all for more accents, though! I wonder if we should start coercing the birthday folks. Raise a cry of, "Speech, speech!"

Mith's picture

Supplicant

That is true. Ah well. It would be interesting.

Also, my friend says he hears Belfast, bit he says it sounds like you've been out of there for a while. He says he definetly hears a hint of Irish in the back, but not heavy.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

And you read very well!

JeVoudraisCake's picture

Supplicant

In truth, this was an exercise against shyness Smile

greatmediocrity's picture

Devotee

I didn't actually read any of what I linked. Those were mostly from area radio shows where the local accent is done intentionally thick as a send up. Maybe if I can get some peace and quiet I'll do what you did, but I'll pick a different reading so as not to step on your toes.

Clare-Dragonfly's picture

Supplicant

The way you say "jam" reminds me of the hobbits from the LOTR movies. That might be more the word than the accent, though!

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