what book is in your hands right this second?

ITT i want to hear what your reading. Why your reading it. Would you recomend it to others. (ok in all honesty i'm just using this as an excuse to find out new authors i'm a book whore) I'll start.

Book: ISLAND
Author: Richard Laymon
Genre: Splatterpunk (wiki it if you don't know what that means)
Favorite line so far(optional): Today the yacht exploded. *its the first line in the book and if thats not a hook i don't know what is.

Would you recomend it?: Several people on an pleasure cruise become stranded when their yacht explodes. then as they start to try to figure out whats going on someone starts killing the men. Laymon is who Stephen King and Dean Koontz read when they want to be scared. warning this is splatterpunk meaning anyone can get killed....HORRIBLY......and there are quite a few parts which will upset you to no end (ie bad things happening to good people.) but thats how Laymon writes. He writes to provoke a reaction. Sometimes that reaction is supposed to be recoiling in horror going "NO ONE CAN BE THAT HEARTLESS AND INHUMAN" also the book has a lot of humor in it.
So would i recomend it? Yes... if your looking for an author that will scare you and don't mind stuff thats (NSFW).

Katie's picture

Embodiment

there is no book in my hands, cuz I'm typing.
Done with my smart-ass moment.

Book: A Feast for Crows
Author: George R.R. Martin
Genre: Fantasy

Would you recommend it?: Yes. This is the fourth book in the series 'A song of Ice and Fire.' I'm not entirely sure what pulled me into the series; the intrigue at court? The Others? The multiple, complex storylines? I'm not sure, I just know I'm hooked.
Dislike: A lot of people that you become attached to--you know, those that you think are the heroes of the story, that can't possibly die? Some of 'em bite the dust. Sad

Other webnovels I'm reading:
No Man an Island
Tales of MU (along with everything else AE writes.)
Superstition
The Mutants

BCT's picture

Devotee

You got to it first! A Song of Ice and Fire is one of my favorite series of all time, right up there with Harry Potter. I have A Storm of Swords and A Feast For Crows here with me, and I'll be bringing the first two back with me after summer's over.

Is A Dance of Dragons due out any time soon, or shall we continue shaking our fists in Martin's general direction?

Trystia's picture

I would NOT recommend A Song of Fire and Ice to anyone! There's already too many people with whom I am competing for the chance to viciously slay Martin for torturing us all with how long it takes him to produce more books. And even worse, my favourite character made no appearance at all in Feast for Crows because of how he split the book into two!

Do not start reading this story, it's incredibly awesome, but once you finish it, you'll just be left in a homicidal rage, wanting to lock Martin up in your cellar and refuse to feed him unless he produces 50 pages a day!

Katie's picture

Embodiment

you absolutely hated it.
The above is why I refuse to read the Wheel of Time series. I started Song when there were 4 books out, and haven't finished a Feast for Crows yet, so I'm not yet ready to lock Martin away. Smile
I do agree with the lack of favorite characters in a Feast for Crows, though. Sad

Hortaux's picture

I love ASOIAF, except for the fact that GRRM leads you into loving his story, his plot, and his characters, and then dawdles between books for about two to three years. Ah, well. I can't hope to understand the Ways of Author, so I won't complain (too much).

ASOIAF is great if you don't mind waiting a really long time to see what happens to your favorite character, and then find out they die, and then get a veryslight hint they MIGHT be alive, and then... have to wait till the book AFTER this one to find out if they're alive. DX

And I just typed this comment nine times, because this computer is craptastic.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I'm on a Georgette Heyer binge courtesy of A, and contemplating the stack of Gaiman that the Crayon lobbed at me through the mail slot. I spose I'm favoring the Heyer because I find it fits so nicely with what I'm doing here, and Gaiman is so good I find it depressing sometimes ("I'll never write a hundredth as well! Oh anguish! Oh sorrow! Gimme that Cadbury fruit an' nut bar!"). Plus also I can pick up and put down the Heyers easily and Gaiman not so much. When I have a few chapters in reserve then I'll sit down with a box of apples and a pot of tea and do a proper read of the Gaiman.

Currently I'm working on "The Black Moth," a Heyer set in the mid-late 18th century, not sure of the actual date. Cracking and silly and fun all at once, with wonderful description and word play.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

but..but...but...its GIAMAN.........but dammit i see your point. You really have to have time dedicated to sit down and work through one of his books (cuz what a joy that is Smile ) and just so you know i'm not stopping till your collection is as complete as mine. its just wrong that you don't have these books. but as to the doubt don't kid yourself. i look at myself all the time and say if only i had HALF his talent.....no scratch that why would i want only half....that would be like saying Mr.Gaiman I'm content producing work half as good as your genius. I wish i had all of your writing ability Mr. Gaiman. (This conversation goes on for a few hours more in my head in which i devour Mr. Gaimans magical writing brain and feel very remorseful about it untill i start producing works of genius that aren't full of gramatical errors and run on sentences. in the end i give him his brain back after getting all the ideas that clutter my head out onto paper and make oodles of money and fans. if your going to dream. i say dream big.) So your not the only one with that feeling.

I swear I'm not a homicidal maniac.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

to make me wonder about that homicidal maniac thing, with all the evil laughter and now this??
Scary, man.
Though at least you give his brain back in the end, I guess.

Kaisar Ryu's picture

Petitioner

Speaking of semi-morbid Gaimony-goodness, who is already ravenous for the Graveyard Book, coming out this fall? I know I am. I'm still wondering how to speed up the calendar so it's release will come sooner.

Eala's picture

Book: Winter's Heart
Author: Robert Jordan
Genre: Fantasy
Would I recommend it? Hell yes.

It's book 9 in Jordan's "Wheel of Time" saga. I've read and re-read these books many times, and they never lose their magic. I'm hopeful that Book 12 (when it arrives) will finish things the way Jordan would have wanted!

I also just started "Sushi for Beginners" by Marion Keyes - I tend to always have some kind of "chick book" on the go ;). Even if it's not particularly light-hearted in terms of subject matter, a break from pure fantasy can be nice!

Arath's picture

It was a good series Smile Which one's your favorite?

Kitabare's picture

Petitioner

Book: American Gods
Author: Neil Gaiman
Genre: Ummm... Delicious Gaimany twistyness (dark fantasy for lack of better term)
Would I recommend it? Definitely

I just found this line on Amazon when I was trying to figure out what genre this book was...
"American Gods is Neil Gaiman's best and most ambitious novel yet, a scary, strange, and hallucinogenic road-trip story wrapped around a deep examination of the American spirit."

Anyone who's read some of Gaiman's work knows the twists and turns he can take you down. For me, one of the most enjoyable parts was reading the portrayal of the different avatars, and trying to figure out who some of them were on my own before it was revealed.

Eustacia's picture

Well, I'm mainly reading casebooks and hornbooks, but for my fun stuff:

Book: In Defense of Food
Author: Michael Pollan
Genre: non-fiction
So far, I like it. Taking it all with a grain of salt, but he makes good points, and hte advice would be helpful to most people here in the US

Book: Gulliver's Travels
Fun, light, easy to read on the commute to school. And its a classic, which is always a plus.

I've got a few other things started, but those two are the main ones my fun time will get... though even they are on hold a bit till finals are done.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

Law school is a pain in the ass.
I'm with you...until noon, Eastern, tomorrow.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I lied. Finished early.

Eustacia's picture

Ugh, lucky. My first exam isn't even til Monday... But today is all about reading Glannon's e&e and Chemerinsky and outlining until I cry.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

1L?

Eustacia's picture

Yup. And... I think I still like it. It hasn't killed me, at least.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I just wrapped up 2L.
If your school's like mine...next year will be worse...*ulp*

Eustacia's picture

Well that's... encouraging. Nyah I'm just hoping that I can make it through interview season alive.
What are you doing this summer? Firm? Government? PI?

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

prosecution.
It's my dream job.
Great hours, government benefits (I mean, after I pass the bar), no psycho clients, the ultimate responsibility is to justice, not to some individual . . . .
Plus, it's litigation-more, and research/writing-less.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

by the by--what are you doing for the summer?

Eustacia's picture

Ha... I'm doing public defense work. So it looks like we're on opposite sides of the system Smile

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

It's a worthy job--I couldn't do it, but I respect you for it...
as long as you're not THAT attorney.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

Book: Interworld
Author: Neil Gaiman and Micheal Reaves.
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy/AWESOME
Best line in the book: "This is a work of fiction. But given an infinite number of possible universes it must be true in one of them. And given it must be true in one of them it follows it must be true in all of them. So maybe its not as fictional as we thought." the intro before the book. hehehehehe

Would i recomend this book: YES! YES! a thousand times yes. just re-bought it in paperback so i don't wear out my nice hardback edition. Its about a boy named Joey Harker. Or maybe its about a lot of boys and girls almost named Joey Harker. Or maybe its about the fate of all possible existences struggling between forces of Magic and forces of Science. Target audience is probably teen to young adult but anyone who's a Gaiman fan will love this book. The pacing is crisp and every chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat. I swear one chapter in the book has me in tears (yes good writing has that effect on me....I cry at sad movies too, I'm such a wuss.) every time i read it. The only thing i didn't like about the book was that it ended. God i hope he continues it as a series of some sort.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I'm not reading it (them) right now, but I just got a copy back from a friend.

The Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay is a trilogy--trite, I know. Kay takes many of the familiar elements of fantasy and weaves a spectacular tale of his own. He borrows liberally from Tolkien (and elsewhere), and his borrowing is aided by his own work helping Christopher Tolkien with the preparation of the Silmarillion for publication.

It is the tale of the war between good and evil, and of individuals caught in the way. I hesitate to spoil the plot by sharing overmuch, but the tapestry is intricate, the characters (I find) believable, if occasionally over-the-top.

They're the only books I have cried over in years upon years--since childhood. They are artfully written, carefully crafted, and delightful to read. They get my fullest endorsement.

Sharkinabox's picture

Have read Tigana, by Kay, and enjoyed muchly. I have a tendency not to enjoy endings, but that managed to not be true for Tigana. Have heard the Fionavar Tapestry unfavorably compared, but I may try it anyway.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

Fionavar is more derivative.

However, that "derivative" nature is intentional.
I really liked Fionavar--not that I didn't also enjoy Tigana...

A's picture

Postulant

Book: Winter Solstice
Author: Rosamunde Pilcher
Genre: Romance
Best line in the book: Not done yet, and her writing doesn't lend itself to one liners, really. Here's a bit I really appreciated though (warning, spoiler): "And I cannot believe in a God who would take Francesa away from me. I sent the vicar home. He departed, I think, in some umbrage."

Would I recomend this book: Absofrigginlutely. I love authors like Pilcher and M.C. Eaton who create crusty characters with flaws and make you love them. This is gradually introducing a fascinating array of characters that will eventually meet up in the north of Scotland and some wackiness is sure to ensue, along with healing and love, themes that are personal favorites of mine, having been healed by love myself.

Book: Three Cups of Tea
Author: Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin
Genre: biography, sort of

Best line in the book: "When Mortenson, with his rapidly improving Urdu, interrupted the speculation to tell them he was American, the crowd looked at his sweat-soaked and dirt-grimed shalwar, at his smudged and oily skin, and several men told him they didn't think so."

Would I recomend this book: Yes, yes, yes. I find Mortenson is a fascinating character, and he is that, a character. The singlemindedness and dogged perserverace that made him a mountain climber is a good personality trait when trying to build a school in one of the most remote areas of the world. I'm not quite halfway done and I'm caught up.

Sharkinabox's picture

Book: The Art of Electronics, 2nd Ed.
Author: Horowitz and Hill (nobody I know even bothers with their first names, and they are almost always mentioned as a pair... I would love to be eponymous some day, but being dragged into a linguistic marriage with somebody else seems a bit confining)
Genre: Bible of Electrical Engineering
Favorite line so far(optional): "We can dispense with the mathematics here..."

Would you recomend it?: Yes, but only if you have some time to spend trying to learn how things work.

Okay, that was a little facetious. I haven't allowed myself to sit down with a novel in months (although I indulge my need for story and fiction here) but I do have books to recommend, I suppose.

Book: A Canticle for Leibowitz
Author: Walter M. Miller
Genre: Post-apocalyptic
Recommended?: Very much so. I won't say much to recommend it, because I think recommendations are only useful to the extent that you know the tastes of the recommender, and nobody here will know me all that much better for hearing me gush about this book.

But really. GUSHING. I would. You would get tired of reading me rave. And you'd be just as likely to try this book as you were before I typed all that.

Also, forgive the quality of this posts. I am in some form of mental akjfdbasecdf at the moment.

Kaisar Ryu's picture

Petitioner

I think I read that first one, or something very much like it, while taking a class in high school. It wasn't the text book I was supposed to be reading, but hey, that class had nothing to teach me, so why not learn where I could?

V's picture

Embodiment

There's a copy of Horowitz and Hill on my bookshelf, too. It's the only EE book I own, but it's also the only one I need Biggrin

Sharkinabox's picture

I must admit to confusion as to the title of your post.

Horowitz and Hill is an excellent book, I'd never deny it.

But it is depressing to think I've read so little else recently.

And the recommendation was bit facetious.

V's picture

Embodiment

Of course it was facetious...I just chose to pick it up and run with it }:) One reason you might not recognize Horowitz and Hill if it hit you in the head is because if it hit with any velocity you might not be conscious Biggrin

But in my book, good books are not depressing. At least...not unless the author intends them to be.

**disclaimer: Not everything I write should be taken seriously**

Kaisar Ryu's picture

Petitioner

OK, Just finished up rereading one series, and while waiting for some new books I'm ravenous for, I am about to pick up another series I've had and read before. I'll use what I'll be reading in the very near future.

Book(s): The DeathGate Cycle, 7 books starting with Dragon Wing
Author: Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman
Genre: Fantasy
Recomendation: Oh hell heah. Great creative pair, writing their own worlds. technicaly post-apoctalyptic, world split into 5 or 6 different peices, depending on how you see it, and gone back to a magical feudal life. And our protagonist, well whats not to love about a heartless bastard who can, unashamed, cause mayhem and madness in the areas he travels to pave the way for his conquering race. Anti-Heros are almost always excelent characters, especialy when you can see why they think that way. And I am not kidding about that heartless remark, read it for yourself. Find these books and read them when you have the chance.

Trystia's picture

I'm all out of books to read at the moment, and no idea what to start on, since the authors I've been reading who are still alive don't write fast enough. If anyone wants to recommend anything, the following are some example authors who, as of Spring Break, haven't written a book I haven't read:

Douglas Adams
David Eddings
Neil Gaiman
Robert A. Heinlein Brian Herbert
Frank Herbert
Anne McCaffrey
Terry Pratchett
John Varley
Timothy Zahn

Kaisar Ryu's picture

Petitioner

Given that many of my favoriate authors are on that list, I figure suggesting a few that arent but are in similar taste might be the thing. Orson Scott Carde and Mercedes Lackey both fit in that mould of the authors you have been listing. And if you can find them, I'd recomend Micheal Stackpoole's original works (though those written in the star wars and battletech universes are good too, an author always seems to shine more in their own realities.) Tamora Peirce writes good works, though targeted at a younger audience. As my mind is not yet fully awake, that is as much as I can think of clearly.

Trystia's picture

I very much agree that authors do seem to really show off their abilities far better when writing purely original material. Much as I feel that Zahn's Star Wars novels are on a level far above most everything else written for the galaxy far, far away, his best work is pieces like his Conqueror's Trilogy. I'll try looking into Lackey and Stackpoole's original works, I tried Card's Ender saga about a decade ago and just didn't get into it.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

I'm actually reading the Conqueror trilogy right now. Smile Annd we seem to have similar tastes in books (I've read almost all of the authors mentioned above!) and I would recommend...

John Scalzi
Elizabeth Moon
Michael Williamson's 'Freehold'
David Weber
Lois McMaster Bujold
aand...
Chris D'Lacey

I'm sure I will think of more as I go through my bookcases. Smile Egad, most of the above are Baen books....

Trystia's picture

Ooh... Weber is the only name there I even recognize! I suspect I'm going to be spending a very long time at Powell's when I get back to Portland after this term ends. Hopefully I'll be able to really get into at least one of those authors, because I'm anticipating the possibility of a lot of travel this summer, and will need lots of books for on the plane if so. (Note: No recommending books with any metal or liquid in them. Blum 3 )

Sidenote: Out of a weird cosmic coincidence, Zahn, who is probably my favourite author, has the same birthday as me.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

I'd start you on Freehold (by Williamson) since that's an almost 700 page book and might by accident last you through the ride.
After that I'd go with Armageddon Reef, by Weber.
And then anything by Bujold.
I read too much. >

MeiLin's picture

Most High

In fact, Sir went into mourning when Jim Baen died.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

I take solace in the fact that his company lives on. I only hope it doesn't go downhill.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

One of TGC's gifties, sweet boy that he is. Speaking of whom, has anyone heard from him/seen him around? I know he's swamped with work, but he usually pops in to say "Gah, I'm swamped with work!" :?

Trystia's picture

Ooh, that was a really good one! First book I read after discovering Gaiman via Good Omens!

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

I'm swamped with life! in all its facets. caught between the proverbial rock and a hard place.

*edit* dammit this was supposed to be a reply to meilins post............i've said it once before and i'll say it again...i r bad at the interwubs.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

It's just that someone else replied first. I'm glad you're more or less here, in any event, even if scattered to the winds!

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

i thought i had failed to post correctly but now i see i was mistaken. I failed at failing. Yeah i don't want to drop completely off the radar sorry if i made you worry.

Kahlmulandr's picture

Glad to see your back.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

ignore this....it double posted for some reason.

Kahlmulandr's picture

Um I'm pretty bad about reading just one book. I normally have two or three I'm reading depending on what room I'm in.
Book1: Up Country
By: Nelson DeMille
Genre: Mystery/Military (not really sure was given to me from a co-worker)
Room: Computer room
Favorite part: "I'm not. I'm just concerned that he might try to kill me again."
"He never tried to kill you, Paul."
"I must have misinterpreted his reason for pointing a loaded pistol at me."
Would you recomend it?: I'd have to say yes though I'm only about a third into the book. It takes a little time to lay groundwork but the overall story is quite enjoyable.

Book2:Without Remorse
By: Tom Clancy
Genre: Fiction
Room: Bedroom (I've read it enough that I can go to sleep without wondering whats going to happen next.)
No favorite line cause I love the whole book.
Would You recomend it? Yes yes yes! I have to admit that Tom Clancy is one of my favorite authors if you like military novels you should try a Clancy book. That being said I've read Without Remorse many times. It focuses on one person who wages his own personal war of vengance on a local drug ring and along the way winds up with the CIA.

Book3: The Ferguson Rifle
By: Louis L'Amour
Genre: Western fiction
Room: Err....."The Office"
Whenever I need a quick read I grab a L'Amour book. While I enjoy reading his works I've also found them to be short reads because they very rarely are over 200 pages. Classic to L'Amour The Ferguson Rifle covers the adventures of one man/group through the wilderness of the new world.

Sadly only the Nelson DeMille book is new to me and even its a few years old.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

But I think of it as "tables." In the TV room, I've got "Good Omens" going. Here at da big chair I've got "Neverwhere." Upstairs in the bedroom it's the Lord Darcy collection from Baen. And somewhere floating around is a Heyer called "Regency Buck."

Katie's picture

Embodiment

In the bedroom I've got Zahn with conqueror's pride
Guest room (which has hubby's computer) is Philippa Gregory with 'The Constant Princess.' In the car I've got Tree Shepherd's Daughter (dunno who that one's by.)

Trystia's picture

The books I read never seem to last long enough for something like that. But I'm a very fast reader. I managed to read one entire 400 page novel on the trip down here after Spring Break and get started on a second, and it was only about a 270 mile trip. The closest I have to this is nonfiction, which I tend to read at a much slower pace, rather than cover-to-cover. So I'll have one book that I keep in my car to read when waiting on someone I'm picking up, one at my workstation to read while waiting for paint to dry, etc. But I only do that at my parents', down here I only ever do it with a single book at a time, and it's my, 'I showed up 20 minutes early for class... guess I should read or something' book. But I've worked my way through those even now.

sarianna's picture

Devotee

...and I'm frantically trying to finish papers. On the current list of books that I'm reading, and for the most part writing papers about...

The Klingon Dictionary. This is for my intro phonology class (yay linguistics minor!); I'm writing a paper about the stress pattens of tlhIngan (the Klingon language, spelled in such). Yes, I'm a Trekkie. I look very cute as Major Kira, as well.

Diesel Fuel by Pat Califia; Loose End by Ivan E. Coyote. Queer lit, poetry and vignettes respectively. Writing a paper on the use of poetic language in these for my Linguistics & Literature class.

The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women's Poetry. Writing a paper on Medbh McGuckian's poetry for my Irish Female Imagination class. It's subliminally sexy! I've got to do a second essay on another section of this book, but I need to talk with my professor first.

The Codex Borbonicus; Codex Espangliensis. For my Native American Pictorial Literature class. Writing a paper mostly on the latter, with references to the former. It's a single-sheet artwork that incorporates the barely-post-Columbian CB and other codices as well as more modern art (Superman and Mickey Mouse, for example) to comment on social conditions in present-day Mexico at both local and global levels.

Daymon's picture

Petitioner

Not reading a book at the moment. I finished off all the books I own already and haven't been to the store in a while. That or wait till I can't remember the books I own, but that takes a while.

I would recomment Mercedes Lackey as she writes some nice fantasy books. Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality is another good set I would recommend as well.

sarianna's picture

Devotee

Heehee, I was just thinking that I want to reread Incarnations of Immortality. Smile

Katie's picture

Embodiment

I preferred the Adept series. Had a hard time getting into incarnation of immortality. Then again, I was 14.
The Mode series was pretty good, too.

Swedgin's picture

Just finished: A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again from David Foster Wallace. It's a collection of essays, the titular one being about a 7-day cruise he took and reviewed for a magazine.
Just started: The God Delusion from Richard Dawkins. It's a whimsical tale of self discovery set against the backdrop of a dwarf piano tuner working in a Turkish lesbian sex cult.
In queue on my bookshelf: A Team of Rivals from Doris Kearns Goodwin, Homo Politicus from Dana Milbank, and Armageddon In Retrospect from Vonnegut. I am anxiously awaiting Sarah Vowell's The Wordy Shipmates. If there is a non-fiction writer that makes me squee, it's her. I luuurve potty-mouthed nerd girls. It's my kink, I guess.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I got through the first quarter before I had to give it back to the person I borrowed it from. You'll like it.

Swedgin's picture

You only had another 500 or so pages to go... Wink
Is it wrong to be intimidated by a book that's notes and index section is 155 pages? I figure The God Delusion should help train my attention span before I tackle it.

Swedgin's picture

Edited, b/c that sounded a bit creepy, although violet appears to be of age in that pic.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I just cracked a borrowed copy of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. So far, I'm hooked pretty good.

It's phenomenally well-reviewed.

Gaiman loved it, among others.

A's picture

Postulant

Didn't get wacky like I thought it would (if you read too many Heyer books with wacky endings you get so you're expecting them everywhere). But it had several surprises (for me) and was a lovely read. And it reinforced my utter and complete longing to live in Scotland.

I've started:

Book: All I Did Was Ask
Author: Terry Gross
Genre: Non-Fiction Anthology of Radio Interviews--what genre is that, exactly?
Favorite line so far: In her interview, Mary Karr says, "I've often said a dysfunctional family is a family with more than one person in it."
Do I recomend it?: If you're a fan of NPR's Fresh Air you'll love it. If your a fan of any of the artists she interviews, you'll probably like it. If you could care less about Carol Shields, John Updike, Ann Bannon, Conan O'Brien, et all (there's about fourty different artists, actors, musicians, and writers interviewed) then take a pass.

Still reading Three Cups of Tea. It's still very good. It took Greg three years to build one school in the mountains of Afghanistan. It took three months to build the next three. It's picking up steam!

Mt. Toberead, as Meilin calls it, is pretty tall.

Hortaux's picture

Book: War for the Oaks (for the 2384936251 time).
Author: Emma Bull
Genre: Urban Fantasy/AMAZINGNESS
Would I Recommend This Book? YES YES AND YES SOME MORE. War for the Oaks is... epic. I can't really find another word for it; maybe it's because I'm young and new in the ways of the world that I find it so delightfully new, but I do. I read it once a year (or more, usually more), every year, and every year it just grows on me more. I won't even go into the plot because I'm so indoctrinated that I'll spoil some part, somewhere. But take my word on it--- War for the Oaks is AWESOME.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

Book: Odd Hours
Author: Dean Koontz
Genre: Sci-fi/Horror? i dunno
Favorite Line: "You don't take sweets from men who threaten to kill you?"
"Thats right."
"Well....more for me."

recomendation: I love the Odd one. I was in the hospital gift shop and found out there's a new instalment in his series and picked it up right then and there. The book kept me happy and laughing and fearful and sitting on the edge of my seat biting my nails and my mind completely off of the bad things happening in my life. I finished it in 2 visitor room sitting sessions and am happy that it leaves things open for another instalment. For those who don't know there are three previous books in the series......Odd Thomas, Forever Odd, and Brother Odd (in that order).....all of which i've read at least 4 times. I tend to read and reread books i like. Meilin your book which is on its way to me in paperback will probably be worn out within a month and a half .......then i'll have to buy another copy.

Samaris's picture

Supplicant

There's a fourth Odd?!?! Damn, I have to find it! I love Odd!!

Lord Playboy's picture

Not very literary I know, but I have just finished rereading all the Flashman Chronicles by George MacDonald Fraser (RIP)

Yes, all 12 of them

Spent the last 4 weekend out in the dusty Cambodian provinces playing chaffer for my wife and the rest of the cast of our new movie. After arriving on location there is nothing for me to actually do other than lay in a hammock in the shade and read.

Not a bad way to spend a weekend, apart from the damn heat.

Lord Playboy
www.khmer440.com

Marri's picture

Supplicant

I saw a "Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell" up there? I read it a couple years ago because my Humanities teacher (who was so epic that he hand-picked a book from his personal library for each of his students and lent it to them for spring break) gave me that one. I greatly enjoyed it and it certainly makes a good airplane book, because of its length.

(Anyone else notice this? http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0468500/)

Terry Pratchett books also make good travel books, though they tend to be much more lighthearted (think Douglas Adams) and read much faster. Discworld in particular- those can be read in the order they're supposed to be read, but I started on book 29 by accident and it worked out fine.

IEGeth's picture

I saw this and decided that I'd try and restart it.

Book: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
Author: J. K. Rowling
Genre: Fantasy (but still in a class all its own)
Favorite Line: "Uncle Vernon made a sound that sounded like a mouse being trodden on."

I know that its a little young, but I decided that I'd read before the next semester began so that I won't be tempted to read through it when I get there. That way I can focus on the important stuff to read... like borrowed manga. Wink

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... I'm reading Richard Herley's Penal Colony, which, among several other novels of his, was freely available from his web site before that one vanished off the net without a trace.

Or I would if my ebook-reader hadn't broken down on me. Sad

If a short term repair can't be effected, I may have to switch to a novel from the increasingly small to-read pile of paper books, probably Joe Haldeman's Forever War omnibus.

Arath's picture

I was/will be reading the two that I started earlier on in the summer, but I got distracted by schooling and the internet.

Author: Anne Rice
Book: The Witching Hour
Favorite Line: n/a... can't think of any
Recommendations: I didn't really get hooked into it like I do other books, mainly because of the way Rice's style of writing is, but this really stuck out as something special compared to the Vampire Chronicles. I haven't read them in a bit, so maybe it's the same thing, lol. Yes, I would recommend it.
Genre: Fantasy...?

Author: Frank Herbert
Book: Children of Dune. I'm currently re-reading the series, going through the order they were distributed to the public... I think. Or I might just go through the whole original series then the prequels (shrug) It will be figured out when I get that far.
Favorite Line: can't think of any off hand
Genre: Sci-fi
Recommendations: Of course!

Enid's picture

Devotee

6 books at once O.o Mainly just bits and chunks here and there. My absolute FAVOURITE novel ever is the one I have quoted in my signature. The Truth About Unicorns by Bonnie Jones Reynolds. It's Romantic fantasy, although definitely not a bodice ripper or anything of that nature. I've only ever met one other person who's read it, and that's my mom. She stole it from a library sometime back in the 70's and eventually I stumbled onto it in her bookshelves between the pirate novels and the true crime stuff. It's unfortunately out of print these days, but generally you can find a decent used copy off of Barnes & Noble for incredibly cheap. I try to force it upon anyone I can, although I refuse to lend out my personal copy because if it got lost I'd have to throw myself off a bridge!

Voyeur's picture

At the moment I'm reading Dead Witch Walking by Kim Harrison. I've read it so many times that the cover is starting to wear a bit lol. But yeah it's a great book, great series in fact.

Marri's picture

Supplicant

Kushiel's Dart, though I've actually finished the first three (Kushiel's Dart, Kushiel's Chosen and Kushiel's Avatar). They are AMAZING. I highly recommend them, particularly to those who like this site; it's another I would add to the list of Reasons the Publishing Industry Clearly Has No Prejudice Against Smut Wink And this is BDSM smut, at that. Well done, adds to the plot, yada yada yada- I mostly read it for the politics, as it's set in alternate Europe- but still. Read, love, etc.

Nye's picture

Supplicant

Also an awesome series. I very much like the story of Elua and his companions.

blwinteler's picture

Supplicant

I have no fun reading right now. I am reading "The Winner's Way" by Pamela Brill.
Ok, I've only read a few pages so far. The HR manager at work got everyone in HR books, based on what she thinks would be good for them. So far, the writing is fairly engaging considering it is a business oriented self help book. I wouldn't want the book she got for my direct supervisor, basically an HR textbook complete with chapter quizzes and reviews that looks incredibly boring, but she is thrilled to have it. To each their own I guess. When I am less exhausted, I will re-read this thread to find something more interesting to read than The Winner's Way.

Pikachu42's picture

Embodiment

reading Congo by Michael Crichton. Unfortunately, I haven't had the chance to full immerse myself in it yet as I'm trying to divide my time between writing my own novel and working like a slave. I've had it a week so far and I've barely made a dent in it so to speak. Normally I'd be reading several novels at once, but I've been out of touch for so long I have no idea where to pick up. I used to spend hours in the library, and I'm sad to say that I just found the library here...(I've been here since June)

Starrysky's picture

I am working on The Phoenix Unchained by Mercedes Lackey and Foundation also by Mercedes Lackey. I love most of her books. It took me several months to finish the current books by George R.R. Martin. I really enjoyed those. Codex Alera Seris by Jim Butcher was astonishingly good.

Veritas's picture

Reading Foundation myself when I'm at home, currently using David Eddings' The Diamon Throne as my travel-novel (I commute). The former is a new one, the latter an old and well loved friend.

rdehwyll's picture

Devotee

Some of the finest 'realisitic' Fantasy available. The characters just sort of reach out and grab you by the lapels to keep your face in the book... Now if only I could afford a trip to Key West to hunt for the Place...

sherinik's picture

Postulant

Or if we can find Mike or Lady Sally or Mary or Finn....I'd love to spend some time in the Parlour at Lady Sally's. Actually, I'd just like to spend some time anywhere at Lady Sally's, or Callahan's Place, or Mary's Place...

Nye's picture

Supplicant

They're full of wonderful stories, and have such good heart. I love the ideas that are spawned in these books... Lady Sally's Place & the fireplace

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

Xenocide by Orson Scott Card
Genera: Sci-Fi
Can't say I have a favorite line but I'm enjoying the book (Wait- I think the whole conversation when Valentine goes to Visit Grego in his cell when he and his brother Olhado are working on faster-than-light-travel. WHile some of it goes over my head- kinda- I love the opening line . . . if only I can find it. SOmething about reconceptualizing teh universe adn "wishing makes it so" (the only bit i can remember off the top of my head)) The one thing that stinks though is that I haven't been able to just sit down and read the book. Being an art student with a near full time job [12-24 hours a week (at Kent State if your a student 30 hrs is full time)] I didn't have too much extra time so its taken me a while to get through. Still working on the last 100 pages or so Sad but hope to be done into time return the book to my friend who lent it to me. Then break from heavy sci-fi. [where to next? Fantasy? I could always revisit Anne Rice with The Vampire Chronicles. . . .or just check out a book. One can only take so much science fiction at a time]
Would I recommend the book? Already have. Recommended the whole stinkin' series as far as I've gotten into it.
Now- to finish reading it. . .

Marri's picture

Supplicant

Did you see there's a new one? Ender in Exile is out, which is between Ender's Game and the rest of the Ender's Game series, and then there's SUPPOSED to be a new one called "Shadows in Flight" or something like that that ends both the Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow serieses. Soooooo hoping my information is not wrong Biggrin

seia's picture

Devotee

I heard about Shadows in Flight too, but that was before Ender in Exile was announced, so I'm not sure Card is still working on it.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

Thats what I heard from my friend who lent me Xenocide (and Children of the Mind, just finished that the other day) (although I think he failed to mention Shadows in Flight. Hmmm. . .) I know he's going apey over it too- big Card fan apparently- wants to make a list of all the books he's written to hang on his wall and check them off as he gets them 0.0. I prefer Heinline myself.
And while I'm here I might as well add to the list what I now have in my hands (kinda). Two books I have started.
1- Demon in My View by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes (hope I'm not butchering her name >. 2- Stranger in a Strange Land.
Author- Robert Heinline
I visit this book about once a year. Love it! Just started to read it last night, already 5 chapters in (then again the first few are kinda short ^-^) Off to read. . .

seia's picture

Devotee

Title: Red seas under red skies (sequel to The lies of Locke Lamora)
Author:Scott Lynch
Genre: I think of it as Fantasy, but with more thieves.
Recommendation: Absolutely yes. It's just as good, if not better, as the first book in the series, though I personally prefer Camorr to Tal Verrar.

Nye's picture

Supplicant

by Neil Gaiman... It's a collection of short stories and poems, several of which have been published in other anthologies or magazines in years past. It's rather good so far, but I have a soft spot for short stories. MY favorite Stephen King books are his collections of short stories.

I might read Gaiman's Stardust next. It's one that I must have missed at some point, considering I've read most of what he's written.

I read about 5 books last week while I was sick, though.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

How could i survive without them?

Current title: Going Postal
Author: Terry Pratchett
Genre: Discworld

I love discworld. Silly with just the right amount of serious. Normaly im a Vimes man (Sam Vimes). I've reread the stories of the watch many many times. But once again Mr.Pratchett fails to disapoint. The story revolves around Moist von Lipvig a con artist forced to rejuvinate Ankh-Morporks lagging postal service. Its fun to read and i had it done shortly after i picked it up (looking around after wondering where the afternoon had gone.). I would definately recomend it.

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

I love Terry Pratchett. I always have to stop myself from buying more Discworld books at the bookstore. I think my favorite character is The Luggage, just because it's so ridiculous.

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

I have a problem making books I really like last for more than half a week.
the book I just finished:
Title: The Mirador
Author: Sarah Monette
Genre: Fantasy

it's the third book in a series, and I put off reading it for a long time because I thought it would be boring. It seemed like the plot had been wrapped up in the first two books, so I assumed the third would be lame filler. It kind of was filler to get the characters in the right place for the next series, but it definitely wasn't lame and boring. It was definitely more character driven than plot driven, and nothing super big and world-shaking happened, but I still only put it down to sleep (at 3am). I definitely recommend the whole series to everyone. it's not a cheerful dragons and whatnot fantasy, there's some angsting and murder and intrigue, also magic and some badass characters. I'm sorry my summary is rather vague, I read the first two books a year or two ago, so my memory isn't so fresh.

Clare-Dragonfly's picture

Supplicant

Savage Breast by Tim Ward. It's nonfiction/memoir, about a vaguely chauvinistic, womanizing, confused guy who travels around (with his girlfriend/fiancee) in search of the Goddess.

From the introduction:
"Why on earth would a man search for the goddess? Especially, a guy like me?
"'Oh, I get it! You're getting in touch with your feminine side!' my friends say.
"No, I have to laugh. It's just the opposite. It's my masculinity, the darkest part of it, that yearns for her, like a lost lover, like an orphaned child.... It's visceral, immediate, a matter of the heart, balls, and belly."

I'm just up to the third chapter but it's really engaging and thought-provoking thus far.

Pedes's picture

Postulant

Hmm, on my right lies, next to my bed:
Johnatan Strange & Mister Norrel by Susanna Clarke. I've been reading it for quite long because it's a damn paperback and too thick to read while commuting :/
On top of it lies "Drowned Wednesday" by Garth Nix (I've just finished Grim Tuesday) - More of a children book; somehow recently I appear to read either completely adult stories, or once for younger readers (Dine Wynne Johnes "Witch Week", T. Pratchett "The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents" ). Funny that.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

I have a friend who turns me on to new authors on a whim. he does it to torment me. He'll hand me a book he got for a dollar at a yard sale and that will be that. i'll have to find and read everything that author ever wrote. He handed me Slade's Children (which was PHAMAZING, which is a mix of phenominal and amazing.) about a year ago and now i think i've read everything Nix has put on paper. I'm waiting for Sunday in the Keys to the Kingdom series now. The Aborsen trillogy was especialy good. anywho on to what i'm reading now.

Title: The Automatic Detective
Author: A. Lee Martinez
Genre:Sci-fi/Detectiv Noir (did i spell that right???)

The third book i've read by this author who doesnt seem to want to settle in one genre and stay there. I'm not complaining. The story is set in the far future and follows the exploits of Mack Megaton a giant War Robot who's A.I. developed full sentience and decided blowing up people for his mad scientist creator was wrong. He now works in the city as a cab driver trying to prove he wont destroy everyone and get full citizenship. Soon into the story he gets entangled in a mystery and must solve it (wont say more than that cuz i'd hate to give anything away). Thats the plot......you cant make this stuff up people. or i suppose Mr. Martinez can. The book is just excelent and so far out of left field your practicaly in the parking lot. Which is the only thing constant in Mr. Martinez's books. He writes about stuff you just wouldn't expect. Which i love.
Recomendations: I would recomend that you go out and buy this book right now. and also Gil's All Fright Diner (a Supernatural Comedy of Titanic Proportions) and In the Company of Ogres (A fantasy that starts with an accounting office and ends with an offer of gardening) Mr. Martinez is in my top 10 authors right now and if he keeps up the quality of book he's gonna stay there a long long time.

Samaris's picture

Supplicant

I have to say I re-read (for the quazillionth time) all four in one sitting, mainly because I love the protagonist - Kel. She's absolutely unbelievable! Smile
So... What: The Protector of the Small quartet (First Test, Page, Squire, Lady Knight in that order)
By whom: Tamora Pierce
Genre: Fantasy
Favourite line: Too many, but most I can't say because they give the story away...! I'll settle for "Gods of fire and ice, bless my new home. Keep my will burning as hot as the heart of a volcano and as hard and as implacable as a glacier" Kel says this when she moves to the Palace. Smile
Would I recommend it? A million times YES! I kinda also go around asking everyone if they've read it. I also lent it to a friend of mine, and I generally NEVER lend my books out; they somehow don't come back as mine, if you know what I mean...
My books are getting tatty from all the re-reading I do, but I can't stop! Smile

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

You do know that Tamora Pierce has other quartets written in the same world-setting as Kel's story, right? Chronologically the first is the quartet about Alanna, then the quartet about Diane Wildmage (which I was addicted to re-reading when I was in high school), and now the Kel books. She's also got a couple quartets in another world-setting and of *course* I can't remember the names of them or their characters now, gah - four magically gifted young teens in bad/neglected situations are adopted/recruited into a circle of elemental temples to find training, friends, and homes.

If you like Tamora Pierce, definitely check out Mercedes Lackey, too. She's got about a zillion books set in her Velgarth world (Valdemar, the Heralds, that female sword & sorcery duo Kethry & Tarma, the Gryphon trilogy) and half a zillion books in other series, including the Elemental Masters and the "Hundred Kingdom" fairytale-twist stories she writes for Harlequin, I think (one of those romance publishers). If you like her even a little bit, you'll have LOTS and LOTS of material to cover.

Robin McKinley is also very good. I love love love love her standalone, "Sunshine" (Best. Vampire. Story. EVER. Stephanie Meyer *wishes* she could write a vampire tale like Sunshine!! Anne Rice should worship at her feet). Holy crap, I hope she writes a sequel to that. She also does a great re-telling of Robin Hood, and then there's trilogy that includes The Blue Sword.

Hooray for female fantasy authors Wink

Samaris's picture

Supplicant

Oh, yeah, I own all the Tortall books, but I was kinda ambivalent about Alanna, and I liked Daine, but I love Kel. She's amazing. And after Kel, ther are 2 books about Alanna's daughter- Alianne. Those were really good too... The other quartet I have yet to get my hands on, but it's called the Circle of Magic, I think... Plus she's writing about Numair and an ancestor of George Cooper... Desperate to read all of them! I will look at the authors you mentioned... I'm in a bit of an in between phase now, and I've yet to find something else to read that will grip me like this. But I fully echo your hurray for female fantasy writers! Smile

Katie's picture

Embodiment

of George is in the book called 'Terrier'. Very well written, go pick it up. Blum 3

Shade's picture

Supplicant

Oh man, Numair was my first book-crush :P. Dear sweet Lord, the man is gorgeous and awesome in nearly every way possible.

George and Jon were okay, though Jon was a bit of a pissy little idiot. Mmm, Numair . . . *drools* Is there a book coming out that's about him?! Shocked

I really liked the ones about Alanna's daughter, mostly because Alanna was so dumbfounded about what to do with a girl who wanted to be frivolous. Tamora Pierce has been one of my favorite authors since I found her, because her female characters aren't useless and petty.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

It makes me feel much better about myself that you had the same experience. Wink My next favorite was whathisname, the crow-man that Alanna's daughter ends up with.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

Yeah, I also adore Nat. I think his name is Nat . . . *eyebrow*. Regardless, yaay :P.

Numair just happened to be my ideal everything, haha. Intelligent, tall, dark hair, blue eyes . . . minus the chest hair (that always grossed me out in The Realm of the Dragons, or whatever the fourth one was called).

.. . you know, looking at the boyfriends I've had (okay, two), they've matched the physical characteristics of Numair. O.o Okay, that's something I probably didn't need to know about myself. LMFAO.

Taslin's picture

Postulant

And yes, he is a darling.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

Definitely worth the read - I picked it (and its sequel quartet ... starts with "Magic Steps" I believe) up first and was a little disappointed with the Tortall books. Maybe it was because I read them when I was a little older, but they seemed less interesting to me than Circle of Magic.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

The Song of the Lioness and The Immortals quartets I read in middle/high school, but most of those books I didn't read until I was an adult!

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

More jaded by stereotypes and Mary-Sue-esque characters? I know it's hard for it to technically be a Mary-Sue in original fiction, but it happens (Usha from Dragonlance, anyone?) Something about the books just didn't quite rub me the right way, but I'll give them another chance if I run across them again.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

I wouldn't say that it is Mary-Sue-ish. I do think that Tamora Pierce writes very definitely for a YA audience - it's fairly obvious that she aims her stuff at 12-16 girls, who oh-so-coincidentally are the majority of her protagonists! However, she's a good enough writer that some of us still enjoy reading her work a lot as adults. I'm not as obsessed with her now as I was in high school, but I'm still happy to read a new book by her.

My current obsessions are actually David Weber and John Ringo. Yeah, I moved from YA "girl" fantasy to space navy and alt. military history scifi. Go figure :shrugs:

The Which's picture

Embodiment

I think I know what you mean. The characters are wise far beyond their years, but I think that can be generalized to all her books. It helps that the books you like the least are the books that I read first, when I was about 13. The circle books are the ones I didn't read until much later, and they seemed very young to me (although I enjoyed them thoroughly).

The Which's picture

Embodiment

Samaris wrote:
Plus she's writing about Numair...

2012 TBD: NUMAIR: THE EARLY YEARS (very tentative title), in which we learn of Numair's last years at the university of Carthak, the beginning of his conflict with the newly-made Emperor Ozorne (Numair's best friend), his quick departure from Carthak, and how he survives afterward, in Random House hardcover in the U.S. and Canada

Samaris's picture

Supplicant

Sigh. Re-reading this old stuff makes me want more Tamora Pierce NOW!

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

I picked up Sunshine randomly when I was in the bookstore and I totally agree with you. As far as love stories + vampires go, it's the best one I've read. dang, all this thinking about it makes me want to reread it, too bad it's at my parents' house Blush

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

Yay! I'm glad you enjoyed it Biggrin It will be a squee-happy day indeed if Robin McKinley ever gets around to writing a sequel.

ETA:
@Katie & @Samrais - I didn't know about the Numair and Terrier stories. I'll have to go look them up - thanks!

Requiem's picture

Petitioner

Reading:

Saturn's Children by Charles Stross
A collection of George Carlin's written works
A tarot book
Transmetropolitan by Warren Ellis and various illustrators
Also half a dozen web serials, maybe 5 dozen webcomics, and a bunch of religious stuff.

Can you tell I have attention problems?

rdehwyll's picture

Devotee

I finally picked up "Variable Star", the Robert Heinlein novel finished by Spider Robinson, and reading it was... strangely weird. Not because it's a post-mortem collaboration, but because I remember reading it BEFORE, years ago -- like 30 years ago! Which is an impossibility, because it was only published in 2005!

Yet I definitely knew the story, the characters, the plot, even some of the conversations, dredged up from memory.

Yes, it ties in very nicely with Heinlein's 'Future History', even makes references to several events that occurred in other books -- and ties in some more recent events that occurred AFTER Heinlein's death... Spider's work, undoubtedly... yet I remember reading those details as well! Let's just say that I am a little weirded out by this. No, a LOT weirded out! That's why I'm awake here at 5:30 in the morning, having sat up all night trying to make facts and memory coincide... and not being able to do so.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

Book: The Traveling Vampire Show
Author: Richard Laymon
Genre: Splatterpunk/horror

So this is one of my favorite books by the late Mr. Laymon. Its the tale of 3 young friends growing up in the 60's when the traveling vampire show rolls to town. Dwight, Rusty, and Slim (not her real name) know they'll never be allowed to go, but figure it'll be worth the trouble they would be getting into. Boy are they wrong. Like all Mr. Laymons work you don't want to read this book if your the kind of person that likes everyone to live happly ever after. But if you like something that can scare your socks off while making you laugh, leave you mildly perturbed, and in some parts very aroused (the romantic parts not the horror parts..........i swear im not a homocidal maniac.) then this is the story for you.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

reading "Frederica" by Georgette Heyer. A brought me another big stack.

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

Book: Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town
Author: Cory Doctorow
Genre: sci-fi

the main character's father is a mountain and his mother is a washing machine. One of his brothers came back from the dead just to kill the rest of them, and to top it all off, the main character helps to give an entire town free wireless internet. there are certain parts in this book that creep the hell out of me, and the characters are really well written. I even get to learn about the internets and various other odd bits.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... since I don't do much reading of the dead-tree kind these days, but I'm working my way through David Weber's Honor Harrington series right now. Next up is #7, In Enemy Hands.

Honor Harrington is space opera. Lots of battles. Missiles. Lasers. Tactics. Politics. One-dimensional, boring characters - the sentient tree-cats that can form empathetic relationships with humans by "adopting" them are by far the most fascinating characters, and villains that are almost caricatures in their one-sidedness.

The underlying world view is that distinct, manichean, prejudiced black and white I have come to associate with the right-wing America under G. Bush. The "evil" side are either Communists, religious fanatics, or megalomaniacal dictators. They are also in their majority basically incompetent. Anyone on the bad side who *is* competent either defects to the good guys or dies wishing he had.

That aside, it's still a fun read.

Goforbroke's picture

Devotee

reading Todd Mcaffery dragonheart and Tom Clancy the bear and te dragon, also just finished The Shack by WM Young. i normally ready 3 or 4 stories at a time

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

Book: Blood Rites
Author: Jim Butcher
Genre: Modern Fantasy

Why do i do this to myself? Why cant i just walk past a bookstore and NOT go in and get hooked on something? So last week i went in and was looking through the fantasy isle. I look over and there are the Dresden File books. I vaugley remember watching an episode of the T.V. series on Sci-Fi and it being pretty good. So i pick up the first book while im there. I just finished the sixth book yesterday. And i'll probably go buy the seventh today. The Dresden Files are the modern day tale of wizardry. The world Jim Butcher has created is fresh and interesting and puts new spin on old ideas. So i realy like the series and am dreading the day i catch up to the latest book and then have to wait for the next installment like everybody else.

Poisonous Giraffe's picture

Devotee

my dad has all the Dresden File books, and I've read a couple. I read them out of order though, so some of it was confusing. I should probably track down all the books. My dad and sister are also really into Butcher's other series(I forget what it's called) and they keep telling me how amazing it is.

Not A Cheez-It's picture

Hot snot, yeah! I really enjoy the dresden novels, even after the first few readings. Even though you know what's coming for some reason it doesn't decrease the enjoyment factor. Some of my friends say the books are too formulaic for them, but that's a risk I suppose any series runs. I still like em Blum 3

Goforbroke's picture

Devotee

never read the dresden files but heard they were really good, i own all of the codex alera series and they are good too, still waiting for the next book on that one Sad

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

An absurdly large number of my friends LOVE those books. I've been considering them for some summer reading once INSANE POLITICAL TEXT reading load is done.
Although I am also considering a few summer classes in addition to work to get my GPA up to where I want it, so we shall see. Sad
Srsly, 3.82 isn't close enough for an honors society? It's got to be 3.85? Bwuh.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

i finished 8 yesterday and am moving on to 9 today. These things are more addictive than pistachios!

Shade's picture

Supplicant

I'm currently reading The Road, and I'm not at all impressed with it. Perhaps that's because everyone I've ever heard talk about it has gushed about how wondrous it is, but I'm really not finding much worth in it. His style is far from groundbreaking, it's frustrating to read. I get it, the brokenness of the syntax represents the destroyed strata of the world the man once knew, blah blah blah. It's annoying to read a book that is completely lacking in grammar.

However, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao is quite amazing.

I've also just finished The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, and I must say this book is wonderful. It's got this delightful surreal quality to it, and I'm looking for Murakami's other works.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I really liked murakami for a while...I read a bunch of his stuff in succession.
Eventually, though, he reminded me of a joke that I don't particularly like:

How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?How is Kenny G like Ravel's Bolero?

ETA: many of his protagonists share alot of characteristics, really, is what I'm driving at.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

Well, that's kind of disappointing to hear, but good to know. I've only read the one, and I really want to read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, but those are the only two I know of.

You read any Storm Constantine? I just got the big Wraethu book and I'm going to start it tonight to see if it's any good.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

none atawl.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

Just took a loverly long bath and read about 100 pages of the first of the trilogy . . . it's . . interesting. Some weird sort of sexual thing is going on, though it hasn't really been explained or expanded upon. The Wraeththu are apparently some sort of next evolutionary step from humans, though humans can become them, and they're a weird combination of male and female, embodying both genders.

I'm going to keep reading if only to figure out what the hell is going on :P.

sherinik's picture

Postulant

Storm Constantine has this really dark alternative sexuality thing happening, there's another series too, about Sumerian demigods among us modern day normals.

The second Wraethu book I felt wasn't going anywhere, but there's character development you need to fully understand the characters' viewpoints at the climax of the third book/series. Post-apocalyptic societal fragmentation, new religions, developing sex-linked magic. I re-read them occasionally - very romantic series in a lot of ways, but still dark and brooding. Yummy.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

As the son of a grammar nazi, I think this is one book I'm going to have to avoid. I wouldn't get 20 pages in before I went looking for the author's spine for their affront to the language...

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I can't see what this is in response to.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

would make the most sense.

Cheez-It's picture

I wasn't a fan of The Road either. I kept expecting it to get better for some reason... it didn't.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

As was said in the post I responded to:

"His style is far from groundbreaking, it's frustrating to read. I get it, the brokenness of the syntax represents the destroyed strata of the world the man once knew, blah blah blah. It's annoying to read a book that is completely lacking in grammar."

Anything completely lacking in grammar would drive me up a wall. Hell, I can't even read bradbury because it seems like he's all over the place in his writing.

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

Currently Reading:
Plan of Attack: Bob Woodward
World Food Security- A history since 1945- D. John Shaw
International Agricultural Trade and Market Development Policy in the 1990s- Helmuth and Hadwiger
Food Aid and International Economic Growth- Center for Agriculture and Rural Development
The Politics of Food for Peace- Peter A. Toma
U.S. Food: Making the Most of a Global Resource- Daved W. McClintock

Just finished: Avoiding Losses/Taking Risks: Prospect Theory and International Conflict- Ed. Barbara Farnham.

Guess what the topic of my research paper is this semester. Guess, I dare you. :jawdrop:

BTW, Murakami is entertaining, but bland after a while. But still entertaining.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

"A Nation Under Lawyers," Mary Ann Glendon.
Better?
http://books.google.com/books?id=0jmSmmjNosQC&printsec=frontcover
"Trial and Error" by John C. Tucker
--great stories from the life of a courtroom specialist.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

Title: Nation
Author: Terry Pratchett
Genre: when i figure that out i'll let you know

Plot synopsisisis: Nation is the story of Mau a boy (or possibly a demon) who is the only survivor of his nation when a Tsunami kills everyone else on his island. Now he must live and rebuild the nation with the help of the Ghost (English) girl who was delivered by the wave.

Would i recomend it: YES! as always Mr. Pratchett delivers a rousing read. "DOES NOT HAPPEN!" is my new rallying cry.

seia's picture

Devotee

Title: 1984
Author: George Orwell
Genre: science fiction/dystopian fiction

Odds are you've heard of it. If not, google it asap.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

This is one of my favorites, it's just so chilling.

I'm currently reading . . . clinical endocrinology and basic and clinical pharmacokinetics. V_V.

TheGrayCrayon's picture

Devotee

1984 the year i was born. Coincidence? ..........yeah probably. good book though

A's picture

Postulant

Book: The Liar
Author: Stephen Fry
Genre: Novel, humor, bizarre espionage caper
Favorite line so far: English boarding schools have much to recommend them. If boys are going to be adolescent, and science has failed to come up with a way of stopping them, then much better to herd them together and let them get on with it in private.

It's what you might expect from Stephen Fry, witty, biting humor, and smart. I can't wait to get dug in.

Book: American Gods
Author: Neil Gaiman
Genre: I'd call it science fiction, except it both is and isn't.
Favorite line so far: "Tell you what, though. This country started going to hell when they stopped hanging folks. No gallows dirt. No gallows deals."

There are a hundred better lines in the book, I just picked the first one that really struck me, otherwise, I'd be searching all night.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I just finished a biography (actually, my first grown-up biography, and my first non-web leisure reading post-PDT). American Lion (I think) by (again, I think) Jonathan Meacham. It's the story of the USA's baddest-ass President. Bullet lodged in his chest bad-ass.

I learned about how deep the roots of the Civil War were (a thing I had forgotten, if I ever knew), and a bunch about the machinations and personalities of other historical figures (Calhoun, Clay, Daniel Webster...). I found it really fascinating. It focuses on his years in the White House, mostly, providing enough context to still feel like a whole picture.

Even so, my big takeaway is still, he was a bad, bad dude.

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