Guns and outdoor activities...

There seems to be some interest, with at least three of us, in shooting sports. So, what do ya'll do? Hunt, fish, camp, punch paper, or can't stand any of it?

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kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

are neat in a shooting club when they belong to someone else. I don't think I would ever own one because I don't like them enough to bother and I think I have enough healthy respect/fear for them that I wouldn't want one in the house. It's a good experience to go target shooting and stuff like that, but I'm clumsy enough that they make me a little nervous. Accidents do happen, and they seem to happen more frequently around me than other people. It's probably unwise to add explosives to that equation.
I love paintball and airsoft guns and other gun-related games like that, though.
I generally prefer to keep my shooting and my outdoor sports separate. I think if I were to hunt, I would give the old bow and arrow a try. I used to be pretty good with a compound bow, but I haven't used it in years. To me, that feels less like cheating than hunting with guns, and it makes sneaking up on things easier, presumably (although I do understand that any hunting takes a lot of skill, etc. Guns are just easier to hit a target with in my experience.) I loved archery when I was a kid. We had a recurve bow (and when I got older we got a compound bow) and there was a straw target in the backyard.
For gun-unrelated outdoor sports, I love hiking/backpacking/camping, and I've been doing a lot of skiing lately, but I guess that's probably slightly irrelevant in this thread.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Your comments on hunting remind me of some of what I thought before I gave it a try Blum 3 I used to think that using a gun was a form of cheating, but taking the actual shot whether with a bow or gun is the least part of hunting from what I've seen. Most of it is finding a good spot, blending in to the landscape and waiting. There also isn't much in the way of sneaking, other than trying to be quiet when you first head to your spot, then not moving or making noise while there. If you try to sneak around on the ground the animals will most definitely know you're there Blum 3
As for the gun vs. bow, I'll give that the bow is a little more challenging, mostly due to the shorter effective range (generally not taking a shot beyond 30m with a bow if you want a clean kill, and most people I've talked to took their deer within 20m), but accuracy inside effective range is generally comparable for a skilled archer (at 25m I'm actually better with a bow than a handgun). Anyway, need to get lab work done, so I'll have to post my outdoor stuff when I get home...

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

why I find it more interesting. I know hunting isn't really all about marksmanship (although I'm sure it helps), but if you have to get closer to the animal to hit it, it seems like it would require more skill than with a longer range weapon. That's the other thing too: accuracy inside effective range is generally comparable for a *skilled* archer. It took me a long time to get any good at archery but my first time out with a gun I didn't do too badly at all.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

For out east, one of the more challenging is turkey hunting, and yes, wild turkeys can and do fly. You can't get too close or they take off. You are either using a shotgun or bow with a range of 50 yards, max. And you are trying to fight nature. You are posing as a hen trying to attract a tom but naturally, the hen goes to the tom.

But it's damn addicting.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

turkeys clear some pretty huge trees. That was the one of the most surprising things I had ever seen as a kid. Sounds interesting Smile I'm not sure if I'll ever try hunting, but at least turkeys aren't really cute, and if it's harder I think I'll feel better about it. Maybe I'll give it a shot someday. Smile

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I've never tried turkey hunting, and honestly don't plan to, but from the stories I've heard, it's actually one of the more dangerous hunting seasons (correct me if I'm wrong on this). Everyone is out in the woods sounding like the animal that everyone else is hunting Blum 3 Turkey season is actually the one time when the guy teaching me to hunt took a few pellets of bird shot in the leg from another hunter.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

You are correct sir. Not that any hunting or outdoor activity isn't dangerous. However, turkey hunting is one of the more dangerous types of hunting. Because you are out there in head to toe camo, making noises like a turkey, and probably with a decoy about thirty to forty yards away. Especially with the increased popularity of the "run and gun" style of some hunters were they try to get as close as possible before setting up.

The key is to stay aware of your surroundings, don't carry or use anything that is the colors of the male turkey's head during the rut, red, white, or blue, and don't doze off.

All of my hunting has been on public land and while I have had some hunts spoiled by the inconsiderate actions of others, have never had incident or injury. Despite wearing orange, chances of being injured by another hunter are higher during gun deer seasion because of the volume of hunters. There are fewer turkey hunters so a single hunter related injury show's a higher injury rate because of the ratio.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I think I'll just avoid turkey hunting, as I don't even particularly like turkey. As far as deer hunting, I've been sticking to private land (though the poor spot available to me is probably the reason I didn't get a deer last year). I may venture on to public land, but it'll be in the upper peninsula where hunters are few and far between due to the sheer area of forest. In general I don't trust anyone else with a firearm until I've checked them out on it Blum 3 Though on that note I've made a habit of taking people out to shoot for their first time, and all of them had to pass my safety course before we even went to the range, and the whole time either I or one of my friends who I trust with a firearm would be watching them. I even had a girl who was fairly anti-gun, but who wanted to actually try it if she was going to condemn it (which I actually really respect her for). She even didn't limit herself, fired not only the .22's, but said as long as she was out there to try it she was going to fire the nagant and the .45. I figure the best way to convince someone that guns aren't evil is to teach them how to shoot safely.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I can understand that. Though, just like anything else, the wild bird doesn't have quite the same taste as the farm raised.

Where in the UP do you go?

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I actually haven't hit the UP yet, I'm planning on going to a public area there this year with Terry, since he's hunted that area before. I hope to be able to afford a rifle with some good optics, but failing that my nagant is going to chalk up a few kills that aren't nazis Blum 3

Requiem's picture

Petitioner

What model of Nagent? And how well do the Mosin Nagent's shoot? I'm looking into getting one (slow process, none locally, so waiting on ATF paperwork that will let me ship one), a little worried about how well a heavily used 80+ year old gun will actually shoot though.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Mine is a M91/30 nagant from the soviet plant at Izhevsk, made in 1943. Mine shoots a little high and right, but once you compensate for that you can drive a nail at a hundred meters, and it isn't even a sniper variant (expect to pay upwards of $700 for those while mine cost me less than $200). The good soviet built nagants were undoubtedly among the most accurate weapons made at the time. A few things to look out for:
Go to http://7.62x54r.net/ make sure the rifle you're buying is a soviet rifle from before the end of the war.
Put a bore light in the rifle and examine the rifling
Check the action, make sure the action is smooth, tight and the bolt releases well on a dry trigger pull.
If after the first time you fire a round you basically have to beat the bolt back, you have a winner. This happened with me, and is because there was some of the original packing cosmoline dried on the inside of the chamber. The heat of the round going off semi-liquefied the original cosmoline and it reset. Once you manage to get the spent round out (this may take some effort and some bruises to the hand/odd looks from the range master as you beat on the thing) go buy an appropriate chamber brush and a lot of gun cleaner, and spend 20-30 minutes just cleaning the chamber where the shell lodges.
Also, above everything except the rifling, check the serial numbers. They should be on the barrel, bolt, butt plate, and bayonette; all of them should match.

I got lucky, not only did the rifling look great on mine, the serial numbers match, the rifle stick to all hell after the first round, but the "with extras" on the sale tag when I bought it meant that it came with original hammer and sickle marked shoulder strap, marked waist pouches for ammo, and a grease can that from the looks of things contains the original WW2 grease. Just make sure that you really do your research like I did before you buy it and really check it out, because there are a lot of crap nagants out there. Any good gun shop will spot you a bore light so you can check out rifles before you buy them. This rifle is just one of the reasons that I would highly suggest you check out Classic Arms in Lansing, MI if you ever get the chance. They know what they're doing, give you little freebies when they get to know you, have a professional gunsmith on cite, and sell very high quality firearms.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I was hoping to get my grandpa's Garand after he died, but that went to my uncle for his collection. I've been trying to find one since but other than the overpriced rebuilds at the stores, the only option I've found is the CMP. But the only CMP affiliated program around me lost the member that was organizing it's affiliation and no one else stepped up.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

My list to acquire, in no particular order:
M1 Garand
Springfield 1903
Lee Enfield .303
Arisaka with the chrysanthemum intact (shittastic rifle, but amazing to find with the chrysanthemum)
Mauser 98
WW2 Luger
Sniper variant nagant

Moving on to those I'd need permits for:
StG 44, Sturmgewehr 44 (the holy grail of firearms as far as I'm concerned)
Thompson
MP 40
BAR

These are the historical firearms that I really want (excluding black powder, that's another list), because while I would only fire most of them once or twice, these are the guns that defined 20th century history. The StG 44 was the first assault rifle ever developed (except for possibly the BAR which was developed before WW1, but not fielded for fear that the design would be stolen). The arisaka was the battle rifle of Japan, and when Japan surrendered, the soldiers defaced the chrysanthemum (a sign of the emperor) stamped in to the rifle out of respect for the emperor. So while the arisaka was a piece of crap as rifles go, finding one with the chrysanthemum intact is a rare thing and means it was a war trophy taken by an American soldier.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I stopped at GM tonight and they had half a dozen Nagant M91/30. Made between 1937 and 1943 on sale for 130.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

That's my model, with the wartime stock and the round high wall receiver.
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinM9130S.htm

The real trick is finding one that's in good shape, especially the rifling. Mine was more than 130, but is in excellent condition, and has all the extras.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

It's got some extras. But I don't know enough about that particular gun to evaluate it. They were pretty well slathered in grease and there was one guy there that bought one as I was looking at them.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

It's hard to tell from just the one picture online (especially as that's only one sample of the stock), but that looks like it would be a post-war laminated stock (note what seems to be a metal insert in the hole for the shoulder strap). The kit looks good, except that they don't show a bayonet. The bayonet was not only stamped with the serial number, but was also designed so that the tip is the screwdriver for taking the rifle apart. Check all the serial numbers first, then check the rifling. If that looks good, take a look at the grease. After this much time the grease shouldn't really be slick anymore; if it's hard and tacky (can leave a defined mark in it with a folded piece of paper for example) it's likely original. If this was anywhere other than a chain like a GM, I'd say see if you could find a way to fire a round through it. If you damn near need a hammer to release the bolt it's also likely original packing grease. You can also check the site I posted to compare the various factory marks; I wouldn't buy one that wasn't from a Soviet factory.
On another note of the kit, I keep debating whether I should go soak my grease can in acetone or not. I'm almost positive it's the original grease because I'd need a knife to remove most of it. Since it's the original part of me wants to keep it even if it does mean the whole thing is one giant semi-solidified mass.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

And each one was a little different. They all had the stamp from a Soviet factory and on the one that I tried, the bolt stuck a little, but not too bad. Some had metal inserts in the stock, some just had a hole for the sling. The grease was still fairly slick. I didn't look to hard to see if it was new over a hardened layer or not.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

If I didn't make it clear before, the nagant is a beautiful weapon. It looks amazing, it feels perfect (though the recoil may leave you with some bruises the first few times), the balance is great... It's a wonderful weapon in all regards. I fully recommend that everyone get one.

Requiem's picture

Petitioner

Davik wrote:
I fully recommend that [b]everyone[/b] get one.

There may be enough of them for that.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Well, maybe not EVERYONE, but they're great rifles. Just save a sniper variant in good condition for me when you're making a run on the supply Smile

V's picture

Embodiment

A friend of mine in college who was an avid shooter had an MO of talking to women in bars, finding that they didn't like + weren't familiar with guns, then daring them to go shooting with him with (various stakes) if they didn't have a good time. I'm not sure he ever lost the bet }:)

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Not only did I take her and her female friend hunting (no stakes), I made a three course Greek dinner afterward while we were cleaning the guns Smile

V's picture

Embodiment

Did you end up with a spit-polish?

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Truthfully, nothing happened. I don't really work that way; I've had my share of flings, and they didn't do much for me. I generally tend more towards friends first, and the girls weren't local, so it wasn't really worth anything more than ensuring that they knew how to shoot and that my culinary reputation was intact.

V's picture

Embodiment

But "cleaning the guns" with a couple coeds left many good opportunities to let pass. TheBoy would have come around and hit it eventually, anyway.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Cheers at least for beating TB to the punch Blum 3

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

V wrote:
TheBoy would have come around and hit it eventually, anyway.

Am I that Angel easy and (b) transparent?

V's picture

Embodiment

I think I've seen you go for sloppy seconds a few times.

kawaiikune's picture
Davik's picture

Embodiment

Yes you are, on both counts. If V hadn't gotten here first I totally expected you to make the comment, or some dirtier variation on it Blum 3

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Hell, I still expected him to make a comment...

V's picture

Embodiment

It's a fairly minor point about the injury rates. I suspect you're trying to make 2 claims:
1) There are more hunters injured during deer season than turkey season due to the larger volume of hunters
2) Fewer turkey hunters mean fewer injured hunters can show a higher injury rate

If both of those are true, then it's still more dangerous *for me* to go hunting during turkey season because I am one of those fewer hunters. My chances of being injured by another hunter are higher during turkey season.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I've been doing the archery thing pretty hardcore for the last couple of years, hitting the range for a couple hours a week of practice when it's warm. Handguns on the other hand I've been shooting casually for about the last 19 years. I'm still better with a bow Blum 3 So I guess what I should have said above, is that inside of 30m, accuracy is comparable for a skilled archer and a skilled shooter.
All of that aside though, I'm really more about the sport of archery than hunting. Most hunters I've known would go out for a couple of weeks before deer season to de-rust the skills, then go hunt. I'll be getting back out to the range in a couple of weeks when the snow melts and the wind dies down and be out there until there's enough snow that I run the risk of not being able to find my arrows. I just think that the ability to put some tasty, tasty venison on the table with the bow is icing on the cake Smile

MeiLin's picture

Most High

We have guns. My main target practice gun is a bolt-action .22 rifle named Martha. Smile

Someone's picture

Postulant

I never thought of you as a gun-owning type. But then again, I come from Canada, where guns are significantly rarer -- and a bigger deal --than on your side of the border.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

Sir and George W Bush convinced me of the utility of guns. At some point this year I'll be getting my concealed carry permit and my own handgun, probably a Sig Sauer. My main defensive weapon is our shotgun, Zoe. Oh, c'mon, you can't have a shotgun and NOT name it Zoe...

Requiem's picture

Petitioner

Why Zoe?

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

Firefly. There's only one season, so it shouldn't take too long. You'll love it, I promise.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

that George W. Bush was able to convince you of anything. Maybe I'm missing something. He doesn't seem like your type of guy.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

That's what convinced me. The more Mr Bush's supporters called, sometimes literally, for the blood of anyone who didn't agree with him, the more I began to realize that them having all the guns wasn't such an awesome idea.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

You should never allow your enemies to have all the weapons Blum 3 Even if I was radically democrat ::shudder::, I'd still have guns, because as we've learned from history, might writes the history books, and he who writes the history books is always right.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

We have taught our daughters Captain Mal's Rule:

If someone tries to kill you, you kill 'em right back.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

I'm pretty sure Captain Mal wasn't the first say something like that Wink Doesn't make it any less true, of course.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

Thanks for explaining! And yeah, Captain Mal has the right idea (even if Capriox is right and it's not an original idea).

seia's picture

Devotee

Where I live, carrying a gun is unnecessary and will most likely just increase the odds of people getting killed. There also seem to be a lot less murders...

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

If you don't mind, where do you live?

seia's picture

Devotee

Gouda, the Netherlands

MeiLin's picture

Most High

As a people, we're just kinda violent. Shrug I think it comes of us being a primarily immigrant nature; we're the people what didn't fit in anywhere else. But that's just a hypothesis with no proof to it whatsoever.

seia's picture

Devotee

You're probably right about being more violent. All the wars you've been in is ample proof of that.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

A brief survey of western history reveals: the biggest, baddest country on the block is usually involved in lots of wars:

Roman Empire (yes)
The English ("The Sun never Sets on the British Empire," whether it's the Spanish Armada, the 100 years war, the Crusades)
the USA

I'm not entirely convinced it's a product of "us" so much as the position we're in.

seia's picture

Devotee

I'm no expert on history, but you could also say that the empires/nations you mentioned became so large because of their willingness to go to war.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

fair enough.

I'm not historian enough to do a breakdown on how many of the wars were offensive vs. defensive (and in more recent history, it gets foggier anyhow...)

Shade's picture

Supplicant

I actually had quite a long discussion with my father on this subject this weekend. He thinks, and I tend to agree, that it has a lot to do with just how the country was formed. The right to bear arms was portioned out just after the guarantee of free speech, after all. We have a lot more space than European countries, and much more opportunity for recreational shooting and hunting, but it's more about the fact that the right to bear arms is one of the most fundamental rights given to us by our Constitution. I'm not sure you can fairly compare the two countries in terms of gun violence, least of all because we have a significantly larger and more diverse population. Of course we have more incidents of gun violence and violence in general - we have more people.

I've never lived in a big city, no - but most of the US isn't big cities, it's small towns. Where I live, it's completely normal to see people walking down the street with a pistol in a holster (usually the person is also wearing a cowboy hat and boots :P), or have a truck with a gun rack and a few rifles. Granted, even 100 years ago this was still 'wild west', and it's still full of what are considered wilderness areas.

I think the bigger issue here needs to be making sure that people who are buying guns are properly trained in their use. Again, where I live, most people have been through the gun training before they hit 14 because the hunting is so good and parents take them out as soon as it's legal.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

What is now the First Amendment was the third on the list, and what is now the Second was initially fourth. They trailed two fairly trivial bad boys: (copy/pasted from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights))

* Article I – Apportionment.

After the enumeration required by the first article of the Constitution, there shall be one representative for every thirty thousand, until the number shall amount to one hundred, after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall be not less than one hundred representatives, nor less than one representative for every forty thousand persons, until the number of representatives shall amount to two hundred; after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall be not less than two hundred representatives, nor more than one representative for every fifty thousand persons.

* Article II (ratified in 1992 as Twenty-seventh Amendment) – Congressional pay raises.

No law varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

The order of the Bill of Rights? probably not nearly as significant as some would have you believe. The First Amendment isn't first because it's most important. Order just wasn't that significant. That said, gun ownership has been more essential, and more protected here--the whole "pioneer" deal, and frontier lifestyle have built a more gun-focused culture.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

I was unaware that those articles were considered part and portion of the amendments, thanks for correcting me.

And you're right in that the specific order really isn't that consequential in the big picture; I meant it as they were both early amendments to protect rights considered absolutely essential. Typed it up whilst sitting in a lecture on immunology <.>

I also agree with the frontier lifestyle point. People out here still take that very seriously, haha. We have a great number of Pioneer Day celebrations and the like.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

nono--you misunderstand. Those articles were proposed in the same document as the First 10 amendments (they failed). That they were early on the list is irrelevant to their "essential" nature.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

Was wondering why the one was in there if it wasn't ratified until a few hundred years later :P.

applejax's picture

Supplicant

but I think it would be awesome. I've been invited to go paint balling as well but it never fit into my schedule. Most shooting ranges have some kind of rental thing, but I don't know if I have any friends who would be interested in checking it out with me.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

when we meet up at WCW. I'm working on getting something together sometime soon, and if you remind me and I've managed it, I can give you details and see if you're free that weekend.

Katie's picture

Embodiment

left from paintballing. I think I'll stick with laser tag.

For shooting, I've only shot two sessions, with a variety of weapons. Was told I'm a naturally good shot by a SF guy. I wish I could shoot more often. Smile

Oddly enough, both sessions were while I was pregnant, two different kiddles. Go figure.

V's picture

Embodiment

We are so doing this. After years of messing around with a custom Spyder, I broke down a little while back and got an Invert Mini. Soooo much fun }:) I usually play at Warzone, not far from URI--where do you normally play?

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

A woman I used to go to school with now owns a place in northern Wisconsin. Myself, I've never played paintball before. Not for lack of trying but I can't get a group together.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

on a field about 45 minutes northeast of here. If you're interested, and I can get a game set up, you're welcome to join me Smile

Slagar's picture

Devotee

I hunt, and fish, and hike, and whatever else I can get away with outside.

I've been shooting since I was about 4 or so, started with a BB gun, and moved up from there to .22's, shotguns, and larger rifles. I've gone deer hunting, waterfowling, and turkey hunting. I had my first gun at age 12 (a pump-action Maverick 12-gauge, 32-inch barrel, and still my favorite). I'm a huge nature nut, which some people find hard to reconcile with being a hunter. It's too complex for a keyboard, so I'll leave it said that anyone who doesn't understand it ought to try it at least once.

I've been fishing as long as I can remember, literally. Some of my oldest memories are of my grandfather taking me out for bluegill at a local pond. I've never loved anything else quite the same way. I'm actually majoring in fish and wildlife conservation as a direct result of the lifestyle I learned at his knees. It's been a hell of a trip, so far.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I agree. Despite what some of the so called conservation extremists claim, those that hunt and fish are some of the best conservationists. They see first hand what's going on with wildlife populations, forrest health, and water quality. Some may have alterior motives for fixing up the habitat and working on wetlands, but what they are doing still benefits the whole.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

You tend to spend days on end sitting out in the woods observing the wildlife Blum 3

Oddfish's picture

Postulant

I tried and tried, but I couldn't make myself care. We've got guns (Walther P5 which is nominally mine, Yugoslavian SKS, Ruger .22 rifle, and Ruger...uh, it's 9mm) but I'm just not interested. No matter how many times I've gone, no matter where, no matter who with, after about half an hour I want to fall asleep. Booms and all. I don't care if other people do it, but it just can't hold my interest. Same with fishing; it's just sitting around waiting to me. I took archery in high school a few times, and that wasn't bad, but it's not something I'd pursue unless I suddenly acquired a lot of money and space.

Goforbroke's picture

Devotee

i love to hunt, fish, camp, pretty much anything outdoors. I own a browning 9mm pistol, a luger .22 pistol that has been modified into a competition shooter and a 10-22 that has also been modified for a competition. I would go into details but there is so much that i am to lazy to type Smile

V's picture

Embodiment

I enjoy target shooting, usually .22. My father has a nice bolt-action rifle and a number of revolvers that are fun to plink with, but I haven't gone through the red tape and permit BS to be able to have one where I live now.

The highest-powered weapon I've had the pleasure of firing is the M60 machine gun, properly trained and supervised at Fort Indiantown Gap. Tracers are fun...

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I started off quite young with an air rifle just punching paper, and within a couple of years had graduated to trips to the range with my dad shooting a range of rifles and pistols (mostly .22 to start, though I remember just about being knocked on my ass the first time I fired the .45). All of this was just punching paper though; my dad had been a fairly highly ranked marksman at one point, but all he did was punch paper.
I pretty much stayed with that for awhile, before I got in to caving (damn, just realizing I'm jonesing to get underground again, which isn't helped by my helmet and head lamp sitting on my desk next to the monitor), backpacking, and to a lesser extent, rock climbing. Even before I'd gotten in to backpacking though I had developed a serious thing for collecting wild foods; I fed my family some truly horrific concoctions from plants I'd found in the woods when I was a kid.
About the time I got to grad school I started to get seriously into archery, which led in to hunting. I also did a little fishing with my uncle, and need to do some more of that since he gave me one of his spare poles. I'm also starting to look in to learning mushroom identification, because there are some really great ones that grow around here (mmm.... morels)
Ultimately though at some point in here I'd really like to throw a few basics into a hiking pack, grab a rifle (or maybe a bow if I feel like carrying that much), and go spend a week or two out in northern Michigan trying to live off the land. I just need to spend some time getting back in to better shape before I go for that one though Blum 3

Requiem's picture

Petitioner

Mostly archery for me, a recurved with no sights (I don't like sights, really, the whole reason to use a bow to me is that its *hard*, why make it easier?). Though i do go out with a .22 and punch paper every now and then, and the shotgun went to the range once. Paper isn't much fun with shotguns though, so its stayed in the closet since).

Looking at getting something bigger, (probably a Mosin Nagent, its cheap if nothing else) for use on a bring your own target range }:)

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I started on recurves, and while I have a 60lb compound for hunting, I really want to get back to recurves. Ultimately I'd like to work my way up to a recurve or longbow with an 80-100 lb pull, and use that for my hunting and target practice. I figure since I'm at the point where I can draw 60lbs for 2-3 hours without getting sore it shouldn't take that long to work up if I practice. The recurves/longbows also seem a hell of a lot more sporting Blum 3 Even with the compound and sights though, I tend to shoot more on instinct than aligning the sight pins.
As far as the nagant, go see the post I put up about selecting one.

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

my family is big into hunting, both bow and gun. My grandfather and uncle did before they passed away, and within the last ten years or so, my step-father's gotten into it as well. We own some land in the Catskills.

I'm hoping to take the hunter's safety course this year, and then file for a pistol permit. So far no one's done it, and there are some family heirlooms we'd like to keep in the family.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Even if you don't plan to make hunting a regular thing, what I've been finding is that there's far more to it than just being able to bulls eye with a rifle or bow. Get the permit and have them teach you while they can just so you can go on a few hunts and learn it. Hell, even if you don't want the animal, give it to them for meat. At least this way you know the skills that you'll need so you can pass them along to anyone else who wants them. I'm having to really put in a lot of time and effort under an experienced hunter who I was lucky enough to befriend just to pick up the skills I didn't learn because my father was solely a paper-puncher (target shooter) when it came to guns. Now though, I hope to be sending my family packets of venison, and while my dad never did anything except target shooting, I know he's looking forward to some venison steaks.

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

My reservation is that my step-father will make me butcher what I kill myself. One of my few stereotypically girly things is that I generally prefer not to get messy. When I fish, I will bait a hook and take a fish off the line myself, but I don't want to fillet it if I decide to keep it. Except I don't usually bait my own hook when I fish, because no matter how I put the damn thing on there, it flies off when I cast anyway...

Step-dad brings home meat every year, and this year he's hoping to try turkey. He wasn't sure he'd like the taste of wild turkey, but since he discovered the turkey fryer, he thinks he'd like it okay. :biglol:

Regardless, even if I decided to learn, it certainly wouldn't become a hobby. My attention span is way too short. I can't go five minutes without having something complex occupy my mind. I can't sit up in a tree all day waiting for something to come by.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

It took me awhile before I realized that I really could just sit in one place in a tree and let my mind wander while my body stayed still. Though some of that is due to the fact that I could just sit there and watch the various birds/squirrels/etc. that didn't know I was there after I'd been still for half an hour. Maybe if you explained that you wanted to learn how to hunt just to pass it on, rather than to do it yourself they'd be willing to teach you and butcher the game for you.

Personally I considering butchering it to be just part of being a responsible cook, because whatever meat I use someone had to butcher, but I'll admit to a couple of nauseating moments when I had to deal with congealed deer blood on the meat I was butchering. It certainly doesn't have to be a hobby, but if you have the basic skills to pass on it could be an advantage.

As far as fish, I've only been out with my uncle to fish once, but I think I surprised him with how I put the bait on the hook. I got tired of the fish taking my bait so I sat there and took the time to stick the hook in one end of the worm and actually thread it up the hook so none of the hook showed and the entire worm was on the hook. Funny thing, we went home with three walleye among other fish, when neither he nor his neighbor had caught a walleye all year... Also, I didn't have ANY bait stolen after I started that. Either nothing bit, or I reeled in a fish Blum 3

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

I don't usually use a whole worm, since we usually have big ones, but it only lasts a couple casts before my cast is followed by a tiny, tell-tale *plop*.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

I don't fish all that often since I have a tendency to get spiked by the spiky bits on the bluegill we usually fish for. I go about once a summer with my grandfather (who makes his own rods, reels and lures. If anyone's interested in a custom order, I can pass along the contact info. He also refinishes old pocketknives.)

Anyway... I always learned that it helps to cover up the hook, at least mostly. Sometimes, we put on so much bait that it goes up the line a little ways. Shrug

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

My hands are too small to get around the fish easily, so I just lay it down flat on its side and take it off the hook that way.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I don't know about bluegill, but the walleye have some seriously impressive teeth. Every time we hauled one of those up I was more than happy to let my uncle stick his hand in mouth range to unhook them, because that just looked like a forest full of puncture wounds waiting to happen. Personally I would have just used my pocket knife on them then and there and had fillets BEFORE unhooking them.

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

Never caught a fish large enough to stick my fingers in the mouth. In fact the only thing I've ever caught that wasn't a bluegill or a crappie was a baby pike about four inches long. And idiot that I was, I threw it back instead of braining it...

Davik's picture

Embodiment

After seeing that particular forest full of muscle driven pain (and those things have far more strength in flopping around than most people might give them credit for), I want more than the length of a pair of pliers between me and the business end. At least with a pocket knife you're starting behind the gills and working backward (assuming you don't just decide to be humane and slit the spine). Also, the mouths on these things could have easily latched on to my forearm if I was willing to put it in distance Blum 3

Raigne's picture

Embodiment

you can hold them in a way that keeps their mouth open. Kind of like holding a naughty puppy by the bottom jaw under the tongue.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I know how to do that with a cat, but I can't say I've ever tried it or seen my uncle do it on a fish. But then his typical method of dealing with the fish was to just drain the water out and wait for them to stop flopping, which I don't consider humane.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

For a Northern (Pike), put your fingers in their eyes to hold them. You don' t have to hold them so tightly as to puncture their eyes, but they don't flop around on you. Not bad eating, but the "Y" bones are a bitch to filet around.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

I think when my grandfather fillets, it's usually two quick slices down the sides and a chop of the head, which seems at least a little more humane than suffocation. He goes through the fish first, then takes the meat off the scales. And then they go into eggs, cracker crumbs, and a deep frier. Smile

I think the thumb hold is best used on not-so-toothy fish like bass.

bov's picture

I joined the world of gun ownership recently with a Taurus Judge. I grew up on a 1,500 acre horse ranch that afforded ample opportunities for quail and pheasant hunting. We had deer on our land as well, but my Dad and Grandfather could never bring themselves to hunt anything larger than foul. Whether subconscious or not, i seemed to have picked up that sentiment. Pheasant is about as large a game as i will pursue. Although i've always wanted to try turkey, but it does sound to be about the most challenging bird hunt. (Although pheasant isn't without requiring some skill.) Where i live now turkey seems to be in good supply. In the glen in front of my office building we regularly see a group of turkey, and can often hear them in the adjacent fields. (Yes, i work at a state of the art Engineering Firm in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains. Complete with 50 acres, two ponds, coyotes and turkeys.)

Back to the Judge. All this to say, handguns are new for me. But i wanted something ideal for home defense. The Judge is cool in that it can shoot 45 ca. rounds or 410 shotgun shells. I currently use 000 slug 410 shells. It may be a revolver, but sqeezing off 5 of those puts 15 32 ca. slugs in a target in short order.

Having two children i have come to the realization that i would do anything to protect them. And it came time to actualize that realization. I am also mulling over getting a concealed carry and a complementary weapon.

Living near the Smokies, i love it all! Camping, hiking, rafting, skiing. I am so looking forward to raising my family here. It already makes my day when my 3yr old says, "Daddy, lets go hiking to the waterfall."

MeiLin, love the Serenity/Firefly references, one of my faves. And Zoe for a shotgun is perfection. Now i need to come up with a name for the judge. Walsh just doesn't seem to fit. Jane would work though!

MeiLin's picture

Most High

For a gun that soberly named to start with, and versatile to boot (who'd expect a shotgun shell from a handgun?), Book is your man.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

That's good. Let the judge throw the book at 'em. :biglol:

bov's picture

Great name. You have a future in the burgeoning trade of Weapon Naming!

MeiLin's picture

Most High

We have a little .22 Sir named Wash, a .22 bolt-action rifle I named Martha, Zoe the shotgun, an SKS named Zorya, and Sir's main handgun whose name I can never remember. When I get my Sig I'm probably going to name it River. We name everything around here. Our house is Freedonia. My computer is Companion. Sir's bike is Chickenbutt, mine is Jebby. Smile

bov's picture

Cool bit of Firefly/Serenity trivia. My wife is friends with Summer Glau!!! They danced together in a semi-professional ballet company in San Antonio, Tx. I'm still waiting for her to score me some Firefly memorabilia. At the very least a signed poster. One of my favorite things to say is, "you better watch it my wife is friends with a Terminator."

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

So, I've been gone the past five days turkey hunting. Glad to say I was successful.

Twenty-three pounds, one inch spurs, nine and a half inch beard.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

Beautiful. Time for Thanksgiving-dinner-in-April?

Davik's picture

Embodiment

That's a hell of a bird, congratulations; it's a hell of a lot bigger than the flock of them that were wandering around my neighborhood last year.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

As a separate note, I don't suppose you happen to have any turkey feathers from that kill that you aren't using? I'm looking to put together an authentic atlatl this summer, but if I'm going to do it right I need actual feathers for the fletchings.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I kept the main tail feathers some some of the wing feathers for my daughter to take to school. If any come back I'll certainly send them your way.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

My grandfather has a garden with deer and turkeys that are constantly harassing his garden and a rifle near every upstairs window overlooking it. Mmm... Venison burgers...

I can shoot him an email and see if he can save a few out to send your way - any idea which feathers you need? I'd assume the primaries, all from one wing, so correct me if I'm wrong.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

You're right, the important ones for fletching are wing primaries. I'd be thrilled if I could get enough feather donations for a handful of the atlatl darts, might even go through and put up pictures of the finished product Smile I would just collect them from the turkeys around here as there's a decent flock near my house, but the neighbors might object to me stepping out on the front lawn with my bow and firing off a few arrows in the middle of suburbia. Now if I can lure them in to my back yard where I have a nice big privacy fence... }:)

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

Just get a license and make sure they're in season. At worst, they'll call the neighborhood watch or homeowner's association on you, and at best, their gardens will thank you. xD

I'll go ahead and shoot him an email - it may be summer before I get hold of them, but I'll reroute them your direction asap.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Truthfully I wouldn't do it near my home just because it wouldn't be safe. There are too many people around, houses too close together, and a 60 lb bow can lob an arrow a pretty long distance. I may look at picking up a permit when the season comes around again, but that's a ways off. As far as the feathers, there's no hurry; I'm just starting the carving on the thrower part, and won't start in on the darts until that's done. Plus between this hour long talk I have to give tomorrow, my research, and my garden it'll be awhile before I even get the thrower done.
Anyway, back to seeing if I can figure out how to turn a fairly short extremely straightforward paper about the action of RNA polymerase into an hour talk...

seia's picture

Devotee

It's not really like the activities mentioned in the original post, but it IS outside: sailing. I mostly do it from early spring to late autumn, as the winter is the best time for maintenance.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

It's an outdoor activity, it qualifies. It's been a long time since I've gone sailing. Used to have a friend that owned a Flying Scott. We ran in the monthly race on the little lake where I grew up. We usually placed second or third but never by enough margin to overcome the handicap for the final standing.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

I took my 2-year-old for her first backpacking trip last weekend. It was only 2.5 miles each way, but it was rough. On the way to our destination she insisted on walking; it took 3 hours. On the way back, after a long night in a too small tent, I carried her in the backpack, bringing my load close to 40 lbs.

ETA: My mom (she's 50, and probably in better shape than I am) went with us & carried the tent, stove, water filter, etc. I basically carried a sleeping bag, sleeping pad & some clothes. Oh, and a 26 pound toddler.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I can't imagine taking a child that age on a hiking trip. I've done a lot of backpacking, and in general I've managed to end up carrying far more than my share, and it really takes a toll. A five mile round trip may not seem like much, but when you're carrying all the weight... Hell, Two trips stand out in my mind: a 30 mile round trip in two days where I was carrying 40+ pounds, which was okay until my then girlfriend got dehydrated and I ended up jogging the last 3 miles. The other was an orienteering race, where I didn't get to choose my team; first thing was two of the girls I ended up with on my team had packs I couldn't curl, much less them. After splitting weight I ended up with a pack I'm guessing was about 55 pounds (instead of the say 25 I had to start with; I was in fabulous shape at this point due to running and lifting, but only weighed about 140). Add that to the fact that I was then a freshman, and the guy who decided to lead was a senior and wouldn't listen to me. He didn't know how to read a topo map, which meant we went through some valleys where I could reach out and touch the hill in front of me while standing up right. I carried that over rough terrain for about 40 miles in a 24 hour straight shot. Even the bottoms of my feet were visibly bruised by the time we stopped.
The only thing that rivaled that for sore/tired that I've had to deal with was Wayne's cave in Indiana, and that was a quarter mile on my stomach in and again out, with a good 8 hours of caving in between. Wayne's cave I'd be willing to do again because it was amazing, the hiking trip with the incompetent leader, not so much.

Shade's picture

Supplicant

That is so awesome :).

Such a good way to bond with your kid :). My parents took all of us camping really often when my siblings and I were young. Spending that kind of time with them was enriching.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

My FIL used to make about six or seven trips per year to the BWCA and decided that when the grandkids turn three, providing they are potty trained, they get to go on a trip. This August oldest will be making trip number three and her sister will be taking her first trip, even though the trip is about a week and a half before her birthday.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

but the diaper thing held me back. Potty training is a must for backpacking! We just had one wet diaper from overnight to pack out.

That's awesome that your kids have a gp who wants to take them out! I've been trying to get my dad to take her fishing (she has a pink barbie fishing pole), but so far no luck.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Now, if they decide they want to golfing, my dad will be glad to take them. Then again, if they are like me they won't go with him becuase he turns everything into a lesson.

Just like playing catch in the back yard. Don't care for baseball, don't plan on playing it, nor will I ever be a quarter back. Lets just throw the ball. I don't care that I don't throw the way you want me to... /rant

Katie's picture

Embodiment

that really kills bonding time.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Quite. It wasn't until my brother got pissed and went off about it that he finally stopped. Golfing is much more enjoyable now. He couldn't understand why we would always ask mom if she wanted to go but never said anything to him.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

My dad loves fishing so much, but managed to suck any joy out of it for my sister & me. All I wanted to do was put a worm on a hook (gross! cool!) and cast over & over again. If I caught something it was just bonus. All I heard was: "You have to keep the line still so it doesn't scare off the fish! You don't need to find another worm! blah blah blah blah blah!"

I think he's a little more patient now, and my daughter might actually enjoy it. He thinks she's too young still, but I'm sure he will eventually take her. Since her father is not around, I think it's important to have some kind of male figure in her life; grandpa is going to have to fill that role.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Okay, couldn't see the picture before.

Nice legs...

Mexican Seafood.'s picture

I've gone deer hunting every season since I was about eight. I wasn't able to get my hunting license and carry a gun until I was 10, which is probably the right age. When I was younger I enjoyed it mostly because I got to spend time with my father and uncles, now I enjoy it simply because it gives me time to get away for a little while.
For fishing, can't say I'm a big fisher, though I do enjoy a trout every now and then. My uncle lives on a brook that has some pretty decent sized trout in it...

Either I'm a pretty sucky deer hunter, or there isn't a lot of deer in my neck of the woods because I've only shot at two...and missed both times.

ALEXANDRIAIrwin23's picture

Houses are quite expensive and not everybody is able to buy it. However, mortgage loans are created to help different people in such cases.

[edited to maintain the amusing thread dependent upon it without giving the assholes their links. DIAF, spammers. -- MLM]

Zandu Ink's picture

Embodiment

You know, if you're going feed the trolls, at least feed them with spam.

Welcome! I think you're going to fit in nicely.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

Zandu Ink wrote:
I think you're going to fit in nicely.

:twss:

...to my penis.

Zandu Ink's picture

Embodiment

I think you are slipping in your old age, TB. You used to be more subtle than that.

erinnstreeter's picture

Devotee

Z, with that particular Sean Connery quote in your post sig, I'm not sure you have a handle on subtle, either, m'dear. Blum 3

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... I think it's safe to say that we are all black here!

Blum 3

Zandu Ink's picture

Embodiment

-rimshot-

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

as opposed to rimjob?

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

That post, combined with your current avatar pic...

*horror*

erinnstreeter's picture

Devotee

S'all about the subtext, right?

Zandu Ink's picture

Embodiment

Rimjobs are generally part of subtext...

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... darker by the minute. Blum 3

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