The incredible edible egg

QUICK! What suggestions for egg recipes do you all have for someone who has never really eaten eggs (I was a picky eater as a young child and am slowly working on remaining this). Please and thank you as always ^-^

Forums: 
fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

Are there any things you really dislike or like? Any dietary restrictions? Let me know and I'll post a few recipes. Smile

Also, I'd suggest creme brulee and bread pudding as sweet things to accustom you to eggy flavours.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

No real dietary restrictions- only time constraints. (I'm a night person trying to be a morning person- sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't)

magalicious's picture

Postulant

Well, the omelette recipe I posted takes about an hour and a half from start to finish - however, it makes 8 good-sized slices of quiche, and microwaves well for quick breakfasts.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

There's always scrambled, just mix with a little milk and maybe some cheese and mix before cooking. One of my more typical uses is to cook one over medium or even a little further to mostly set the yolk (any more I put a ring mold in the skillet and crack the egg in to that, but not everyone has ring molds), then eat it on an english muffin with either a slice of american cheese or a smear of cream cheese. The omelette is also always a favorite; start off like you would for scrambled eggs, pour it in a non stick pan (you might want to lightly grease it first), and cook without moving it until the bottom is set, then a little filling, and tri fold like a burrito. The filling could be something simple like some cheese, but my favorite involves a little oil packed tuna, some capers, a little onion, and some parsley (I have an actual recipe somewhere if you want it).
Oh, and for all of these remember: salt, pepper, and eggs keep cooking a little after you remove them from the pan.

temporaryglitter's picture

Petitioner

I consider myself a pretty decent cook, but for some reason, no matter how many times I've tried or how many times someone else shows me how to, I can never master the omelette. I am very jealous of those of you who can.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

I usually cook my egg flat until it's sturdy enough to flip, then flip it, fill it with stuff, and fold over once the stuff has melted. It's taken some experimentation, but it seems to me that the critical step is waiting long enough on side 1, so that it doesn't go all over the place when you do the first flip.

Kitanzi's picture

As a picky eater, is it that you don't like the taste or the texture or something else entirely? The taste is easy to mask, and the texture depends partly on how you cook it. Are you looking for anything in particular?

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

Uhh... not to seem like a moron, but I can't figure it out. Help?

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Just click on create content under your name. I had to ask too Smile

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

I never even noticed that link, geez. Thank you!

Paisleigh: Recipe created. Smile

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... under Create Content, there is a Recipe option.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

feel silly...that one took me forever to find, and in the end, I think Mei had to point it out to me.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

I'm just a picky eater in general.I think it stemmed from the childhood "Eat this" "No." "eat this because I said so" "No!" "Eat this!" "NO!"
Eggs in particular- I can't rightly remember the last time I had a predominantly eggy food but I'm going to hazard guess that it would be more the taste than the texture (although sunny side up, over easy, and eggs along those lines don't look particularly appetizing >.

magalicious's picture

Postulant

runny yolks, I'm so with you. I need my eggs cooked done and the yolk broken!

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

I don't think its a runny yolk issue, the eggs just don't look appetizing when prepared in such a fashion- scrammed eggs and quiche (the whopping one time I made it in home ec in high school) were more appetizing in appearance.

Vayshe's picture

Petitioner

runny yolks are an acquired taste.....

if you decided to try something along those lines, try an over easy egg served on top of hash browns or toast. it kind of soaks up the yolk.

V's picture

Embodiment

and I posted it here. Hard boiled eggs, 5 minute prep time--quick and easy. I'm also a big fan of the basic hard-boiled egg sandwich on white bread with just a little mayo.

Nye's picture

Supplicant

I had a quick before-bed breakfast that I often made:

I would melt a small pat of butter in an egg pan.
Dice some tomatoes
Shred a little cheddar, provolone, or cojack
Maybe slice some mushrooms or olives
A normal person would probably put diced onions and/or peppers in the pan first, but I hates them.

Cook mushrooms a little first (and onions or peppers if you're using them). At the point they're almost cooked, add a couple eggs. Cook them like scrambling. Add pepper and salt to taste. Add a dash of A1 (I liked Bold). When the eggs are almost done, add the tomatoes and cheese. When the cheese is melty, it's done.

The mixture was stuffed into a pita lined with a piece of lettuce. Yum.

Cait's picture

Quiche, quiche, quiche. Its a wonderful eggy pie that tastes better than it sounds, my favourite is Spinach Quiche, but Ham and Tomato is great as well :). Also, poached eggs are god. Really. Floating above the clouds with a benevolent expression and sadistic sense of humour is a giant, tasty, glorious poached egg on toast. With salt and pepper.

Bedazzled101's picture

Petitioner

A great simple intro to eggs is to mix it into a dish you already like such as stir-fry...or mixed into black beans with rice. I'm extremely picky about eggs myself. I abhor scrambled eggs with milk in them, it changes the texture and taste too much...even the smell turns off my appetite. Also make sure you buy free-range hormone free eggs. I personally love eggland's best.

All you do is whisk 2 eggs together, then pour into a non-stick pan(preferably not teflon) on medium heat. wait till the edges firm up and break it up into small bits with your spatula. For your first time doing eggs, cook them to a firm consistency. Then toss in a stir-fry with veges or in some black beans. Or eat them plain with a bit of ketchup and Tabasco if you like spice.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I've gotta ask, what kind of non-stick do you have that isn't teflon? I have a fair number of seasoned iron skillets, but the only stuff I would call non-stick is teflon.

MeiLin's picture
Davik's picture

Embodiment

Please tell me you aren't one of those people who's against teflon. The only issue with teflon is if you put it over heat that is in excess of 500 degrees. If you keep it to regular saute temperatures you have no problem at all. Even then there's debate as to whether the teflon actually has any effect on people. So yeah, general rule, don't sere in teflon, don't stick a teflon pan in the oven. Other than that you should be fine. Also, look at all of this and you should see a damned good reason to buy a stainless steel skillet.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

They shred it within months. I always end up with bits of teflon in my food. I do fine with properly seasoned cast iron, and so far, no one here has figured out a way to shred cast iron. Smile

Nye's picture

Supplicant

this was always my problem, too.

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

A study showed that in normal use, some fumes are released. I can try to dig up the study for you, if you like.

Teflon/nonstick = evil, imo.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

Alton Brown is enough of an authority for me; if he won't use teflon, neither will I. I

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

is my hero! I love how scientifically he presents cooking. Almost all of the other cooking shows I've seen are a little too extreme or fluffy, and he has great ideas and cool facts, and he's very methodical. I swear by his microwave popcorn recipe.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

I love learning the science behing the cooking, and some of the silly ways he presents it are just great. I used to have a bit of a crush on him. The Iron Chef episode where Joel McHale was a judge was a dream come true for me; two of my favorite people, together, talking about *food*! Ahhh.

Joel McHale on lentil ice cream: "I'm not sure if it's a compliment, but you can really taste the lentils"

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

with Joel McHale, but clearly I'll have to remedy that. Smile

The Which's picture

Embodiment

He hosts The Soup. I am in love with him.

applejax's picture

Supplicant

Joel McHale =

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

does it necessarily follow, then, that 33>= Joel McHale?

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

Maybe it does, but I always thought that:
3==> = Joel McHale

MeiLin's picture

Most High

We watched it last night instead of the Oscars. Smile

amiciaN's picture

Petitioner

I have a cookbook my mother bought me one year for Christmas called, "What Einstein Told His Cook". It's a great read, even if you don't use the recipes.

amiciaN's picture

Petitioner

My right side isn't nekkie anymore!! Biggrin

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

And thanks for the cookbook recommendation!

The Which's picture

Embodiment

Just put 1 AND 2 on hold at my local library!

Davik's picture

Embodiment

I love good eats; it's really nice to have someone focus on the more scientific side of cooking, even if I think he takes some of the theatrics a little far. I also find that I end up disagreeing with him on things occasionally, the worst of these was his statement that you can't sharpen your cooking knives yourself. Maybe it's just that I grew up keeping my pocket knives sharp, but I don't think there's really much to it, and my cooking knives are always sharp enough to shave with. Another one that just occurred to me was his thing of doing roux in the oven, because if you try to do a brick or black roux in the oven there's a damned good chance you'll burn it, and I've never had one fail on the stove top.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

Or (and this is very appropriate to this post) how disgustingly runny he says you should leave omlettes. *gag*

I kind of like the theatrics, especially when giant models of food drop down from the ceiling Biggrin

Davik's picture

Embodiment

Ah, this is one of those things that I agree with him on, but I like my eggs nice and runny, whether they're omelettes, scrambled, or over very easy (just enough to set the whites) on top of hash browns and doused in hot sauce Smile I always had to make two batches of eggs when I was cooking for my last girlfriend because she wouldn't eat them my way.

Paisleigh's picture

Devotee

Now you guys have me missing cable (and myjob at the bowling alley. . . where they had cable). Food Network was one of my favorite channels (along with History, Discovery [sometimes] and, theoretically, Boomerang, although I might be missing one)- with this show ranking as one of my favorites on this channel (Unwrapped was another). Alton Brown made me giggle with the way he presented his information.
Which brings me to another tangent- I have the Food Network cookbook. Say the word and I'll post a recipe or two ^_^

V's picture

Embodiment

I-m so happy
Anything that you particularly like in there?

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

o.

that's my favorite part of "the word." }:)

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

Hard-annodized pots and pans are non-stick, but they are not coated with teflon. They are a little bit more expensive, but I highly recommend them.

Davik's picture

Embodiment

My cookware is a bit of a mix, with stainless, cast iron, and non-stick all for specialty applications, but most of it is calphalon anodized aluminum. It's fabulous cookware, but I wouldn't really call it non-stick, especially for something like eggs (which is really about all my non-stick gets used for). I generally think my cast iron is actually a little better at being non-stick than the anodized, but generally all the cast iron gets used for is either frying or flat breads like tortillas and naan. The other nice thing about cast iron: about $5 a skillet; it also makes good camp cookware as long as you aren't backpacking, since it's almost indestructible.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

So, I've tried several different types of cupcake pans, but none last more than a couple years. I can't find any in pyrex and am thinking about getting some of the silicone ones. Has anyone used, or have experiance with, the silicone baking pans?

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I use silicone liners for a regular muffin tin and they're incredibly awesome.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

I've looked at those too, but my issue is with the pans themselves. I'm looking at the pans where the whole thing is silicone.

Gudy's picture

Embodiment

... though no cupcake pans, and while I'm not madly in love with them (I find their generally floppy disposition a but unnerving), they certainly work well enough.

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

Well if people are gonna complain about Teflon, then I'm gonna toss out my advice: you don't *need* to buy eggs with labels saying "free-range" and/or "hormone-free", unless your belief system says those labels are worth the extra money. Regular eggs are just as tasty and good for you Wink

Personally, my favorite quick egg snack is a variation on the "egg mcmuffin" - a heap of scrambled eggs or one fried egg, sandwiched with a bit cheese between two pieces of toasted carbs (bread/bagel/english muffin).

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I had chickens for three years, and their eggs were NOTHING on anything I could buy in a store. Yolks so dark they were almost red, and the tastiest eggs I have ever eaten. Dammit, I want my chickens back!

Capriox's picture

Embodiment

Off the top of my head, I would guess that your results stemmed from: a) freshness and b) different breed of chicken than commercial layers (like McIntosh apples in the store vs. an apple you just plucked off the Granny Smith tree in your backyard). But, I don't know chickens and the industry as well as I do my own, so I'd have to ask around.

The Which's picture

Embodiment

I think the big difference is that even "free range" commercial chickens are still fed predominately chicken feed. But backyard chickens... I know my girls hardly touch the stuff in the summer. It's the dark green weeds they eat that give the yolks that orange-y color. I dont know if it makes a difference nutritionally, but they sure are pretty!

MeiLin's picture

Most High

My girls were in a tractor--a portable chicken house. We fed them kitchen scraps (including meat--chickens are NOT vegetarians) and brought them weeds and grass if there weren't enough in their current spot. They kept the extra lot mowed. Smile They ate feed, and we'd give them a little crushed grain for "scratch" to make them happy now and again, but mostly they ate bugs, weeds and scraps.

The darker the yolk, the better for you the egg is, and our eggs were never lighter than a deep yellow. I should have taken a picture of the yolk that was so orange it was nearly red. The freshness didn't hurt, either. Smile

The Which's picture

Embodiment

In the bottom of one of the boxes of christmas stuff this year were a dozen hibernating beetles. I have never seen my girls eat anything so quickly. They are definately not vegetarians! I dont have a lot of meat scraps to give them (since I dont eat it) but bugs are a great source of protein, anyway.

(not my image, but pretty representative)

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

Or leave them out? I know in Europe, they tend not to refrigerate them because they're fresher there. What did you do?

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

I've been buying organic eggs, and some yolks are much darker than others. Do you know why this is, and if it's good (and why)?

The Which's picture

Embodiment

All right, I've been researching this. The darker the yolk, the more of certain carotenes it contains. (For more science, see here)

Dark yolks contain more carotene.
Pasture raised chickens lay eggs with dark yolks.

The eggs from pasture raised chickens contain more carotene.

Heehee, logic.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

That's cool, thanks! I'm betting there's a Good Eats special somewhere that covers that. Thanks for looking it up!

magalicious's picture

Postulant

My family had chickens when I was a kid, when we lived in a pretty rural area. We had about a dozen, and I named them *all* Henrietta. They had a stationary coop inside the barn, attached to a run outside the barn.

V's picture

Embodiment

that they didn't learn to answer to their name? Otherwise, that sounds like a recipe for disaster...

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

It took me a minute to figure out where I recognize Henrietta the Chicken from, but that was it! I loved that book!

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I toast the bread in the toaster oven, with cheese on top already. Then I flop the fried egg on top. If I'm lucky, I add bacon.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

and I don't want to have to wash a pan, I throw an egg in a bowl, scramble it, and put it in the microwave for 1 minute. Sometimes it makes popping noises, but it's always fine. I occasionally add diced onion or garlic for flavor. Add a sausage patty or bacon, or just eat with ketchup or buffalo sauce.

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

An animal's diet has a significant impact on the taste of its flesh and its products. And I do not think the type of diet most commercial hens are fed is optimal.

Also, local eggs are much likely to be fresher and thus tastier and healthier, regardless of how the hens were treated.

Shinjinarenai's picture

Postulant

It's an eggy pancake-textured custard with fruit in it that has lots of eggs in it but doesn't (if made properly) taste very eggy- more like a pancake or crepe with fruit. I LOVE them. I'll put up a recipe on here right away.

EDIT: Actually, just go here: http://www.joyofbaking.com/breakfast/CherryClafoutis.html
It gives a nice guide as to what clafoutis is and how to make a nice cherry one. Yum.

magalicious's picture

Postulant

I love these! I ate crepes or clafoutis with fruit and yogurt almost every day last summer. Perhaps I should start again, after all that heavy winter food ... >.>

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

...are actually very tasty! In the frozen section of Trader Joe's.

Bedazzled101's picture

Petitioner

Hard anodized cookware is a dream for me, I have a perfectly sized glass pan I love to make omelets in also....and for some reason eggs don't come out tasting the same to me when cooked in Teflon(I wonder if its psychological...lol). Oh, and Pam cooking spray completely puts my taste buds out of whack...so I stick with canola oil, olive oil, and butter for cooking in stainless steel.

I use silicone coated tools and bamboo tools...but I end up with micro scratches on the Teflon from storing them in my gigantic pan drawer(rendering the pan doomed for the garbage). If small birds can die from cooking on Teflon coated pans at normal temperatures(reached after only 2 minutes), I don't feel I should be too eager to keep them in my own home. I try to keep my environmental impact to a minimum...so glass, cast iron, stainless steel, hard anodized aluminum, and glass are preferred by myself.

Here is a reasonable article on the subject:
http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_I...
here is an article regarding cookware safety:
http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_I...

magalicious's picture

Postulant

I use cast iron or ceramic coated cast iron almost exclusively to fry; anything liquid I use stainless steel. I'm very picky about what I cook in, because it affects the taste so much. Once, very recently, my sister made a very liquid stir fry in cast iron (she deglazed with wine), and I tasted metal for two days ... not good.
I hate Pam spray too, so I use butter, EVOO, or sesame oil (which is surprisingly good, especially for asian dishes.)

fairnymph's picture

Embodiment

Or I did, growing up with most of my food cooked in cast iron with a disregard for acids. I'm pretty sure it explains why I wasn't anemic until I left home.

*hmm I wonder if it partly explains my liking the taste of blood*

The Which's picture

Embodiment

completely off topic, but your post reminded me: Sam Beam is AWESOME.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

Shame his cousin Jim isn't better...

The Which's picture

Embodiment

Oh, listen to a little Sam Beam (who is Iron & Wine, give it a listen everyone) and drink a little Jim Beam... sounds like a mellow evening!

MeiLin's picture

Most High

"Woman King" is one of the direct sources of Macca's story.

Bedazzled101's picture

Petitioner

I've never eaten something out of cast iron that had a lot of sauce unless it was a ceramic coated dutch oven or something like that...I thought it was supposed to be sacrilegious or something like that LOL. I know that taste you are talking about...I had that taste in my mouth after dining at a friend's home. Believe me, I always invite them over instead now. But for sure that taste doesn't half bother me as much as Pam.

NorthwoodsMan's picture

Embodiment

Don't particularly care for eggs myself. But like bread pudding and custards. The other way I like actual eggs is on a breakfast pizza or breakfast burrito. Probably because the flavor of the eggs is lost on all of these things and as long as its not over cooked, they aren't rubbery.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

are my favorite food. Try a strata! I'll dig up my recipe and put it in the recipes section eventually, but look one up on the internet in the mean time. It's an amazing breakfast casserole with eggs, bread, sausage, and cheese. I also make scrambled eggs and add sausage and American cheese. Try french toast, if you're looking for an egg product that you can pour syrup on. Hard boiled eggs are also amazing, and are great with salt. If you're trying to hard boil an egg, make sure you put it in a bowl of ice water as soon as you're done so that the yolks don't keep cooking after you take them out of the water. They can turn green if you don't (and they're plenty edible, but they don't look yummy). I also crumble hard boiled eggs and put them on salads and in pasta salad. Egg salad sandwiches are also great, and V's instructions look good. You can also try eggs benedict if you like foods with sauce on them, but the sauce is a little tricky for some people. I also throw a fried egg on top of Mexican foods and chili, because you don't notice the gooeyness of the yolk when it mixes in with a sauce, and it really adds to the flavor, I think. If you like hard boiled eggs, check out deviled eggs. You halve the egg lengthwise, take the yolk, and mix it up with paprika and some other things, and then put it back. It is delicious. If you want recipes for any of those things, let me know and I'll see what I can help with. I would say, though, for a beginner to eggs, start with something like french toast, an egg sandwich, or the strata.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

take fresh hot pasta, stir in egg & cheese until egg is cooked.

take fresh hot rice. stir in salsa, egg, cheese, and a dollop of sour cream.

kawaiikune's picture

Embodiment

fantastic! I'm definitely going to have to try both of those.
Also, I just remembered...the best recipes for fried rice include an egg. I usually do cooked rice, an egg, soy sauce, a little hot sauce, and various vegetables (peas, onions, garlic, celery, etc).

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

I've actually never made fried rice...I make a something with a partially-un-condensed cream soup (half the required milk), onion, veggie, rice, cheese. Start the rice, make the soup (w/ half milk), mix in sauteed chopped onion, veggie chunks, and a little grated cheese.

Laureril's picture

Supplicant

Imo, those are the best sort of recipes. They're always a little adventurous, but they're usually either absolutely amazing or "What-the-Hell-was-I-thinking?!?!"

On the topic of Eggs - try a scramble! We usually make these for brunch after grilling out, but you could do it with pretty much anything. It's basically a big communal omelet with none of the fancy flipping.

Chop the following into approximately 1/2" cubes:
-Meat (Steak preferred, chicken can work - feel free to replace with Tofu.)
-Potato (Chopping up formerly baked potatoes works well)
-Optional ingredients: Chives, mushroom, tomato, bacon, onion... pretty much anything else you might find in an omelet.
-You will also need grated or shredded cheddar (about 1/2c. per person) and about 2 scrambled eggs per person

In a large skillet, heat chopped ingredients, then pour scrambled egg into the skillet, stirring to coat before it cooks. Using a folding motion (or just stirring for the non-cooks) rotate the mess until it's cooked all the way through. Top with cheese and serve.

Cheez-It's picture

An Italian favourite: drop a couple of raw eggs into a bowl of hot beef bouillon and float a slice of toast covered in parmesan on top. The soup lightly cooks the egg but it should be relatively runny. Iz nice.

MeiLin's picture

Most High

I love egg-in-soup like that.

TheBoy's picture

Embodiment

on the cheap, you can do it with ramen and some frozen peas (or somesuch)...

though that may have gluten.

On the cheap, others can do it with ramen and some frozen veggie.

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